By Zach McDonald ·
May 17, 2011

LaHood Visits Nissan Battery Facility, Says Tax Credit Reforms Are Coming

Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood visited Nissan's plant in Smyrna, Tenn., today to check out construction of the carmaker's new $1.4 billion battery facility there. The secretary also took the opportunity to tell executives and workers at the factory that he's optimistic an important reform to the federal $7,500 per vehicle EV tax credit will be part of the next tax bill to makes its way out of Congress.

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By Brad Berman ·
May 03, 2011

Bi-Partisan Representatives Introduce New Act to Promote Electric Cars

There aren’t many initiatives that Republicans and Democrats can quickly agree upon, but deployment of electric cars is one of them. Both sides of the aisle support a strong EV future in the United States, as a strategy for job creation and reducing dependence on oil. Today, U.S. Representative Judy Biggert (R-IL) joined Reps. Edward J. Markey (D-MA), Jerry McNerney (D-CA), and Anna Eshoo (D-CA) to introduce the Electric Drive Vehicle Deployment Act—legislation designed to fast track the deployment of energy-saving electric vehicle and plug-in hybrid technologies.

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By Luke Tonachel ·
April 21, 2011

Innovation Motorcade: Electric Drive in the Nation's Capitol

Earlier this week, Secretary of Energy Steven Chu kicked-off the Innovation Motorcade from the Department of Energy Headquarters in Washington. This was not a typical motorcade for the Capitol City. Instead of long black limos with government plates, this was a parade of quiet, clean electric vehicles occupied by citizens proud to be driving around on little, if any, gasoline.

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By Zach McDonald ·
April 20, 2011

DOE Announces Google Maps Partnership, $5M in New Public Charging Funds

Secretary of Energy Steven Chu revealed plans yesterday to award $5 million in funds to cities and communities nationwide for public charging initiatives, under the department's Clean Cities initiative. The program will also fund the formation of a new partnership between the DOE, Google, and 80 other companies and plug-in deployment groups, to create the country's first definitive charging infrastructure database using the Google Maps platform.

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By Zach McDonald ·
March 29, 2011

California Says EV Charging Stations Will Not Be Regulated as Utilities

Last summer, the California Public Utilities Commission ruled that the regulation of electric vehicle charge stations falls outside of its purview, clearing the way for charging providers to enter the market without having to worry about a dizzying—and arguably prohibitive—array of pre-existing regulations written for energy companies. Yesterday, California State Assemblywoman Fiona Ma introduced AB 631, which would formalize the CPUC's decision to stay out of the market. But should the absence of any laws protecting public charging consumers give us new reason to worry?

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By Zach McDonald ·
March 28, 2011

European Commission Proposes Ban on Gas and Diesel Vehicles by 2050

The executive body of the EU has announced plans to bar gasoline- and diesel-powered vehicles from European cities by 2050. In a just-released white paper detailing the scheme, the European Transport Commission outlines how the proposed policies will aim to make transportation in Europe cleaner and safer, but says “curbing mobility is not an option.”

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By Nick Chambers ·
March 09, 2011

Republican Senator Buys Nissan LEAF: 'Patriotic Not Sending Money to People Trying to Blow Us Up'

If there's one thing about plug-in cars that makes them great conversation pieces, it's that no matter what your concerns or political stripes there is something beneficial in them for you. From the environment, to supporting a local economy, to decreasing dependence on foreign oil, to national security, electric cars have the potential to kill many birds with one stone. One Republican Senator—Lamar Alexander—is proving this point in droves by continuing to be one of the most outspoken electric car advocates in Washington D.C.

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By Chris Ellis ·
February 25, 2011

Warning: Treat European Values for EV Consumption with Caution

The UNECE (United Nations Economic Commission for Europe) is responsible, among other matters, for harmonizing fuel and energy consumption standards for vehicles. Despite its name, UNECE covers not just Israel and Russia but also Canada, the United States and Turkey. The UNECE agreement on the testing of the electricity consumption and range of electric and plug-in hybrid vehicles has been in place since late 2009. Buried in the agreement is the requirement to measure the energy consumption of a vehicle when running on electricity alone “at a steady speed of 50 km/h.” Fifty km/h is only 31 mph, and there is no acceleration or deceleration during the test.

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By Nick Chambers ·
February 15, 2011

Obama's Proposed Budget Pumps Up Support for Electric Cars, Bipartisanship Hard to Come By

In the weeks following President Obama's State of the Union Address, the Administration's public campaign to increase support for electric cars and associated infrastructure has been gaining both steam and focus. In coordination with Democratic members of Congress, Obama has renewed his call for the U.S. to become the first country to get 1 million electric cars on its roads by 2015. With the unveiling of President Obama's proposed federal budget, those words have been turned into concrete steps—but does it have legs?

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By Chelsea Sexton ·
February 12, 2011

Rodents Love Electric Cars and Other Stuff

This week's example of "we wouldn't be talking about this if a plug-in car wasn't involved" is the nonsense about the Chevy Volt being especially inviting to rodents. I was both surprised and dismayed at how many people continued to cover this story as if it was news. On the other hand, there are a few other stories that deserve our attention.

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