Tell Your Elected Officials to Extend Federal EV Charging Incentives Now

· · 3 years ago

In February 2009, Congress passed the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, which allocated hundreds of millions of dollars in green vehicle grants, loans and incentives. One of those incentives provided 50 percent tax credits toward the purchase of electric vehicle charging equipment—capped at $2,000 for individuals and $50,000 for businesses.

Unfortunately, unlike the $7,500 federal incentives that the same stimulus bill offers toward the purchase of a plugin—which phases out for each automaker after its first 200,000 electric vehicles have been sold—the charging infrastructure tax credits have a set cut-off date: December 31, 2010. That means that unless Congress takes action to extend them, the federal vehicle charging incentives could expire before all but a select group of early adopters have had a chance to take advantage of them.

Plug-in America, which worked hand in hand with members of the House and Senate to draft the original bill, is calling on Washington to pass that extension by the end of the year. In a post on its website, the group is asking electric vehicle supporters to write their elected representatives in support of the measure.

The site includes a tool to help you contact those officials with a standard form email (which you can personalize if you like), and Plug-in America does the rest—sending the message to your local congressperson, senators, and President Barack Obama.

Should supporters succeed in passing that bill before the end of the lame duck session, an extension of the current charging incentives could potentially be tacked on and signed into law in time to kick in before they expire on New Years Day.

Comments

· Signe Erickson (not verified) · 3 years ago

Progress is good for our country!

· Lad (not verified) · 3 years ago

I don't think the Republicans will support any form of energy but fossil fuels; They are locked in step with what the oil, coal and gas companies desire. And, they don't care for electric plug-in cars. If it doesn't pass before the Republicans control the House, it won't even come up for a vote.

· · 3 years ago

@Lad: Where I'm from, and in most of the country, electricity is generated by fossil fuels. In Kentucky, our electricity comes from coal which is mined in the state. KY coal mine operators are huge supporters of Sen. Mitch McConnel, so while he is in no way an environmentalist, he might be convinced to support a program to encourage people to "fill their tanks" with locally grown coal.

· · 3 years ago

@Lad: Where I'm from, and in most of the country, electricity is generated by fossil fuels. In Kentucky, our electricity comes from coal which is mined in the state. KY coal mine operators are huge supporters of Sen. Mitch McConnel, so while he is in no way an environmentalist, he might be convinced to support a program to encourage people to "fill their tanks" with locally grown coal.

· · 3 years ago

"TrasKY", I live in West Virginia and it is time we stopped allowing coal, oil, and natural gas companies fool us in believing these fossils are going to be here forever and that is the only three job sources available in our states and without them, the people in Kentucky and West Virginia will be jobless and end up living in total poverty. Take a look around you, the greatest majority of people in our two states, because of these fossil fuel companies, already live in poverty. Lexington is the most polluted city in America because of coal burning power plants and West Virginia in #1 in the nation in chronic childhood diseases because of coal and oil burning power plants and natural gas fracking. If we, you and I, cannot stop this, these companies are going to destroy our states and leave us with the clean up bill. Electric cars and their charging stations is a step in reducing our carbon foot print on our land and if Kentucky and West Virginia built two mega geothermal power plants at about the cost of 5 billion for each state, we can totally eliminate the need for coal, oil, and natural gas extraction and live healthier for the rest of our time.

Instead of jumping on the dirty bandwagon of a vanishing source of dirty energy - jump on the clean bandwagon of clean, cheap, and environmentally friendly energy that geothermal can bring both states.

· · 3 years ago

@JamieDavis I whole heartedly agree with you. I was only stating, from a tactical viewpoint, that pushing electric vehicles can be sold to morons like Mitch McConnel as being "pro-coal."

And I am more than aware of how polluted Lexington is. It is so bad here that I can literally watch a just dusted table become dusty as if I were viewing a time lapse video. It's horrific. The problem in trying to sell the notion of electric vehicles to people like McConnel or owners of coal companies is that they live in an entirely fictional world based solely on subjective reality. Global warming? Hoax. The Bible says the earth is 6,000 years old? Jesus had a pet dinosaur. So it is hard to talk to these folks without resorting to arguments like electric cars sell more coal.

· · 3 years ago

@TrasKY and JamesDavis,
I agree with TrasKY's approach of selling EVs as "pro-coal". Even with 100% coal, the environmental impact of EVs are no worse than from a Prius and much better than any pure ICE.
Unfortunately, it is hard to get the hard-core environmentalists to comprehend that fact so they always come down hard on anyone who breathes anything good about coal.
It seems pretty clear that an EV running on American coal is way better than an ICE running on foreign oil - in all respects.
Of course, I'd much prefer to run off of American wind, sun, rivers, etc. But we still need to get the EVs on the road.

· · 3 years ago

"TrasKY" and "ex-EV1 driver", you both have very intelligent and level heads on your shoulders. Today, I wrote to West Virginia's two Senators and said almost word for word you did about selling EV's in West Virginia. It would increase coal production and preserve its notch for quite some time, and that would create more coal related jobs. I appreciate your understanding about how badly the fossil fuel companies have devastated both Kentucky and West Virginia. These companies and these two governments cannot be reasoned with, so we have to come at them in a different angle until they can be voted out of office. It is good to see your understanding.

· · 3 years ago

Jamie, yes, it it about the only approach to take. And, while we have to accept that it will be difficult to get coal producing states like ours to wean themselves off coal entirely, pelletization, the process of incorporating pelletized switch grasses and other bio-mass, into coal can decrease carbon output by about 10% during power generation, not to mention that the carbon added is the carbon removed by the grass itself. If our states can switch to EVs and then work on lowering emissions, starting with our current system and adding wind and solar, we can greatly reduce our footprint. But we have to get our foot in the door. I wrote to my Representatives, too, although I'm not sure if contact Jim Bunning would do much good even if he weren't leaving office, given his either senility or dementia.

@Zach: In the latest rendition of Obama's please-sir-can-I-have-another capitulation to the GOP on Bush tax cuts, at would appear that "Tax provisions aimed at increasing production of hybrid automobiles, biodiesel fuel, energy-efficient homes, coal and energy-efficient household appliances would be extended through the end of 2011 under the bill," according to HuffPo. So, whatever agitating we've been doing has had some effect, it would seem, because two days ago it was only ethanol subsidies, and we all know what a fraud those are.

· Michael (not verified) · 3 years ago

@Lad, From the Center of Responsible Politics, ""They (oil industry contributors) play both sides of the aisle," said Edwin Bender executive director. "The money goes to whoever is in power. They want to be at the table talking."

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