Plug-in Charging Infrastructure to Cover Entire I-5 Corridor in Oregon; Aims for Mexico to Canada

· · 3 years ago

ECOtality, one of the largest suppliers of electric vehicle charging equipment and networks, today announced that they will be expanding the EV Project in Oregon to include DC fast charging stations on the southern stretch of Interstate 5 in Oregon. This announcement came hand-in-hand with Oregon's governor, Ted Kulongoski, committing to spending his state's own funds to install more DC fast charging stations to fill in any missing holes.

(DC fast charging = fill your battery from empty to 80% full in less than 30 minutes)

The addition of this southern leg will add to the already planned extensive charging coverage on the northern portion of I-5 from Portland to Eugene, and would make Oregon the first state to have a complete DC fast charging network from north to south along one of the most heavily-traveled highways in the nation—although the state of Washington may have something to say about that.

"Our vision for Oregon is to create an electrified highway so that Oregonians, and our visitors, can travel throughout our state on business and leisure using the next generation of clean, electric vehicles," said Governor Ted Kulongoski. "With the partnership of the federal government, our utility companies, local governments and private companies like ECOtality, we are quickly turning that vision into a reality."

As many of you know, the EV Project—a joint effort of ECOtality, Nissan, Chevrolet, and the US Department of Energy among others—seeks to install a vast network of charging stations in selected regions over the course of the next year to support the coming onslaught of plug-in vehicles. ECOtality is the supervising manger of the EV Project, and will oversee the construction of $230 million worth of electric vehicle infrastructure. The public-private initiative is funded with a $114.8 million grant from the U.S. Department of Energy stimulus funds and is on track to install 15,000 charging stations by June 2011. With the solidification of plans for I-5 in Oregon, the vision of an electrified highway from "Baja to B.C." is one step closer to reality.

"Oregon is leading the West Coast in the adoption of EV infrastructure," stated Jonathan Read, CEO of ECOtality. "With this announcement, residents will be able to travel the entire state of Oregon, from the Washington border in the north to the California border in the south, and can rely on the EV infrastructure ECOtality is installing. In the future, ECOtality hopes to expand our deployment on the I-5 corridor to link the West Coast from Mexico to Canada."

In addition to the DC fast charging stations, ECOtality will place approximately 20 Level 2 stations in Medford and Ashland. The expansion of charging infrastructure into Southern Oregon was spearheaded by area stakeholders, including the Rogue Valley Clean Cities Coalition, and the newest EV Project national partner, PacifiCorp.

Comments

· JJ (not verified) · 3 years ago

Will electric cars all have the same shape inlet?
Or will each car company have their own inlet plug?
Otherwise the stations will have to have tons of adaptors like on the small AC-DC chargers.

· · 3 years ago

JJ, good questions. Yes there are standardized plugs which are essentially global in scope at this point, so, no worries on that end. Some "older" electric cars (e.g. RAV4 EV, Tesla Roadster) will need to be upgraded to use the new standardized plugs, but all future EVs will support these standards. The DC fast charging standard (as opposed to the Level 2 standard) is the only one that's a bit of a wild card, considering the current standard comes out of Japan and the SAE has yet to adopt it. But all signs are pointing to SAE adopting that standard in the next few years because by then there will be 200,000 plus cars that already use it and hundreds or thousands of stations around the world.

· JJ (not verified) · 3 years ago

Thanks, that's good.
I never seem to have the right adaptor in milliamps nor the right plug to use it.
Let's keep it simple. Simple will attract more buyers to EV and away from gas engine cars ICE.

· EGM (not verified) · 3 years ago

A few years ago the "Hydrogen Highway" from San Diego to Vancouver/Whistler was all the rage ... to be built in time for the 2010 Winter Olympics.

It's great to see the west coast has seen the (electric) light.

Let's hope it spreads around North America.

· · 3 years ago

EGM, good point. I think the fact that electric charging infrastructure is infinitely easier to install than hydrogen filling infrastructure will ensure the success of this endeavor. There are no environmental impact surveys, no risk for spills, no need for large underground storage tanks, no need to figure out ways to get the "fuel" to the filling station... all an electric charging station takes is a permit, an electrician, some equipment, hardware, a relatively small bit of money, and the desire. When you consider that a hydrogen fuel station may cost in the region of $100 million, and a even a regular gas station costs about $5 million, the price of a $50,000 electric charge station that can be sited virtually anywhere that has electricity is a steal.

· JJ (not verified) · 3 years ago

Those are good points Nick.
I was always trumpeting that with electric cars you don't need gas, no oil changes, no mufflers to rust, no emissions tests, etc etc etc.

But I had never realized that the future charging stations will be so easy to install and no gas leaking into the ground etc etc.

More points for me to trumpet but most whom I talk to about EV cars' advantages only look at the negative and poo poo the whole EV future.

I just see them as brainwashed by the ICE and oil companies LOL.

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