Entry-Level 2013 Nissan LEAF Price Dropped to $28,800

By · January 14, 2013

Nissan announced today that U.S. pricing for the new 2013 Nissan LEAF will start at an MSRP of $28,800 for the newly-added S grade, making it the lowest priced five-passenger electric vehicle sold in the United States. Depending on location, some consumers may purchase the vehicle for as low as $18,800 with qualifying federal and state tax credits, putting the LEAF on par with gas-powered vehicles of its size.

Nissan recently began U.S. assembly of the 2013 Nissan LEAF at its manufacturing plant in Smyrna, Tenn., a localization initiative that further drives efficiencies by leveraging already-existing equipment and processes while also reducing exposure to fluctuations in foreign currency. The battery packs that power LEAF are built in an adjacent facility in Smyrna while the vehicle's electric motor comes from Nissan's powertrain plant in Decherd, Tenn., further supporting efficient manufacturing.

Eligible consumers can take advantage of a $7,500 federal tax credit, and some states and municipalities offer additional incentives. For example, California residents can get a 2013 Nissan LEAF for as low as $18,800 after the federal tax credit and state rebate of $2,500.

Nissan will also continue its lease offer for the 2013 LEAF, allowing consumers to lease the electric vehicle for as low as $199 per month for 36 months, which includes tax credits and destination charges.

Additions to the 2013 LEAF include: 17-inch alloy wheels and leather appointed interior on SL models, available Around View Monitor and 7-speaker BoseĀ® energy efficient audio system and a 6.6 kW onboard charger that significantly reduces 220V charging times and is standard on SV and SL models.

Manufacturer's suggested retail prices for the 2013 Nissan LEAF:

  • LEAF S - $28,800
  • LEAF SV - $31,820
  • LEAF SL - $34,840
2013 Nissan Leaf grades

This slide from a Nissan presentation reveals all the different ways to mix and match features for the different trim levels of the 2013 LEAF. Pricing for add-on packages is shown below.

Comments

· · 1 year ago

Well goodbye Civic LX. :D

· · 1 year ago

It looks like CHAdeMO DC Quick Charging is part of the top of the line SL trim.

· · 1 year ago

Actually, the QC port comes standard now in both the SL and SV trim levels, and is available in add-on "charger package" in the S. [Correction: standard only on SL model.] I don't know what that charger package costs. See the new image in the article above--I added a slide from a Nissan presentation from Saturday. You'll need to squint to read everything but it reveals how Nissan is taking almost a modular approach to try to get the right package at the right cost for as many buyers as possible.

· · 1 year ago

@Brad - QC is std only in SL. In both SV & S they are options. The 6 KW charger comes std in SV & SL - and is optional for S.

· · 1 year ago

This resets the prices in the EV market - the i MiEV and the Smart Electric Drive and the Chevy Spark EV and the Focus EV - all EV's will needs to be lower price. Shock and surprise - the initial generation of EV's need to be loss-leaders.

Because electric cars are that important - they are the future and we must drag ourselves, kicking and screaming, away from fossil fuels. That way is dead end.

Neil

· · 1 year ago

I would very much like the base trim level. Its missing the level 3 port which I have no interest in, incandescent halogen headlights which are perfectly fine for me, and a standard audio system which, in a car, as far as I'm concerned is fine.. 3.3 kw charger is also fine for my use. I would love a 48 kwh or larger battery option. Right now, the standard range just doesn't cut it for me.

But otherwise, well done Nissan for coming up with a vehicle with *ALMOST* everything I'd want.

· · 1 year ago

This is good news. An informed Leaf S buyer would want to opt for the 6.6kWh charger, if it's known that they would probably use the vehicle for city-only commuting. If you charge almost exclusively at home (overnight) and use the public Level 2 EVSEs for an occasional top-off, 6.6kWh charging would suit a very large demographic of potential EV customers.

Any word on what Nissan has done to address hot climate battery depletion problems we witnessed last summer? Are the Smyrna/Hitachi packs more robust in that respect?

· · 1 year ago

I signed a lease on a 2012 Leaf SV last week. I couldn't wait for the 2013 model because my Pontiac G6 was totaled. I've never been so happy to have a car totaled. Since I've taken possession of the Nissan Leaf, I have new nickname for my other car, a 2011 Honda Insight hybrid. I call it, "the gas hog".

· · 1 year ago

Fuzzy slide de-fuzzied (and more):
http://www.sfbayleafs.org/news/2013/01/2013-nissan-leaf-product-highlights/

Option packages pricing:
http://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-aT5umSR0n1Q/UPR752EdUBI/AAAAAAAAA40/TZ...

~30k$ pre-incentives for a quick-charge-capable EV, kudos Nissan.

@smithjim, congrats! Almost 11k miles on mine, love it. I still can't get tired of its ridiculously smooth acceleration... :-)
@Ben,Bill: I found 3.3 kW charging plenty sufficient for home/work; for occasional range boosts on the go though, absolutely nothing beats L3 aka quick-charging. A 10-minute QC compares to ~3h on 3.3kW L2 (~1.5h on 6.6kW). There are many trips I wouldn't have done without it.

· · 1 year ago

@Benjamin Nead

"....An informed Leaf S buyer would want to opt for the 6.6kWh charger,...."

Hum u mention 2 different cases and you say both need the bigger charger. Maybe you meant one of them to be the standard charger.

Alternatively, you mean that only the uninformed would want the 3.3 kw.

I'm cognizant of the difference, and for me, its not that big a deal.

In a GM or Via product, you only have the 3.3kw as your only choice. But as I've mentioned elsewhere I believe part of the reason is due to Europe not allowing large single phase loads, therefore GM's diminutive standard can be used world-wide with no changes between countries. Plus, no one is talking about GM cars "overloading the Grid" anymore. I'm sure if power companies had their druthers they'd prefer the smaller charger to minimize electrical demands.

· · 1 year ago

This is promising. I hope Nissan keeps pushing the envelope so that when my lease expires in 2015, I can get a BEV that covers 2/3 of my miles driven instead of the 1/3 I get now.

@smithjim - you sound a lot like me. My wife and I refer to our 2010 Honda Insight as the gas guzzler!

· · 1 year ago

Perhaps what I'm getting at, Bill and "O," is that the 6.6kWh charger - given that CHAdemO isn't installed on the Leaf S - makes on-the-go Level 2 charging all the more quick and painless. But, If I'm reading the Nissan option package hyperlink correctly, the $1300 charger upgrade on the Leaf S included the 6.6 Level 2 AND the CHAdeMO?

· · 1 year ago

Thanks Mr. O - I posted the clear images into the story. Lots of ways to mix and match features--all cheaper than before.

· · 1 year ago

When does the 2013 Leaf go on sale? I thought I read March 2013 once before, but I'm not sure if that's still the case.

· · 1 year ago

Dont forget the range will be extended as well in 2013 !

· · 1 year ago

@Benjamin Nead

According to the revised screen, apparently $1300 plus tax gets you a Rearview Monitor ( I 'd assume thats a camera), 6.6 kw charger and DC quickcharge port..

I like that they are making that an option. If I were buying a Leaf, I'd want none of those 3 things (my choice), but I would hold out for a 48 kwh battery option.

I'm glad though that the concept of *Options* is making its way into EV land. That way each buyer can, cafeteria style, pick what features one wants and eschew the unneeded ones.

· · 1 year ago

Looks like you also don't get the heat pump heater with the base level trim.... That's fine for where I live, since when it gets really cold out, the HP's COP drops to under 1 (in other words, useless). In moderate weather I can tolerate just the seat heaters. But there's not much of that kind of weather around here.

· · 1 year ago

Looks like you also don't get the heat pump heater with the base level trim.... That's fine for where I live, since when it gets really cold out, the HP's COP drops to under 1 (in other words, useless). In moderate weather I can tolerate just the seat heaters. But there's not much of that kind of weather around here.

· · 1 year ago

As soon as it arrives in France, I buy a model SL. I'm really looking forward for this super car!

· · 1 year ago

It was about time that the Leaf dropped their prices, I think the technology behind it drove the price up a bit too much

servicing stop

New to EVs? Start here

  1. Electric Cars Pros and Cons
    EVs are a great solution for most people. But not everybody.
  2. Seven Things To Know About Buying a Plug-In Car
    A few simple tips before you visit the dealership.
  3. Federal and Local Incentives for Plug-in Hybrids and Electric Cars
    Take advantage of credits and rebates to reduce EV costs.
  4. Guide to Buying First Home EV Charger
    You'll want a home charger. Here's how to buy the right one.
  5. The Ultimate Guide to Electric Car Charging Networks
    If you plan to charge in public, you'll want to sign up for charging network membership (or two).
  6. Comprehensive Electric Vehicle Charging Guide for Businesses
    How do you ensure that electric car owners will be happy with every visit to your charging spot?
  7. How to Use the PlugShare EV Charging Station Tool
    Locate EV charging stations and optimize their use with a powerful mobile app.
  8. Guide to Quick Charging of Electric Cars
    Add 50 to 60 miles of range in about 20 minutes. Here's how.
  9. Calculating the Real Price of EV Public Charging
    Compare the cost of charging on the road to what you pay at home.
  10. Eight Rules of Electric Vehicle Charging Etiquette
    Thou shalt charge only when necessary. And other rules to live by.