Nissan Announces LEAF Lease Special Rate of $289

By · June 04, 2012

Nissan LEAF

Lease a 2012 Nissan LEAF for $289 per month for 39 months with $2,999 due at signing.

In an effort to increase sales of the all-electric LEAF, Nissan is now making an attractive lease offer. Qualified customers can lease the 2012 Nissan LEAF SV for $289 per month for 39 months with $2,999 in out-of-pocket expenses (excludes tax, title, registration and destination charge), based on 12,000 miles per year. That's a relative bargain considering that the LEAF SV retails for $35,200.

The lower lease reveals that Nissan is aware that it must dramatically increase the pace of LEAF sales if it's going to achieve sales targets for 2012. The company was hoping to sell 20,000 LEAFs, doubling U.S. sales compared to last year. In April, Brian Carolin, senior vice president for sales and marketing for Nissan North America, told Detroit News that, "Our target has not changed."
However, through May, year-to-date 2012 sales of the Nissan LEAF reached only 2,613 units. That's only slightly above last year's pace, in which 2,167 sales were reported through May 201.

Most LEAF lessees opt for the well-equipped LEAF SL rather than the base SV. LEAF SL lessees will pay a bit more—$319 per month for 39 months with $2,999 down and 12,000 miles per year—but the SL features the desirable quick-charge port, fog lamps, a rear-view monitor, and a solar panel spoiler.

Dealerships across the US are now advertising the LEAF as being in stock and ready for immediate delivery.

Comments

· · 2 years ago

They might have difficulties pushing 2012 models since they've been suggesting various non-trivial improvements to the 2013 model. Most of the early adopters seem to have their LEAFs, so now they have to entice the curious but less otaku customers - whom I can imagine would be more willing to wait if new features are on the horizon.

The lower leasing rates are interesting, though. Based on personal usage data I've collected, replacing my 2004 Jetta with a LEAF would save me about $80/mo in fuel (subtract gasoline cost, add electricity cost); so effectively $210/mo. That's not too shabby.

· Spec (not verified) · 2 years ago

Everyone is just waiting for the Smyrna, TN plant to come on line and see if they drop the price then.

· · 2 years ago

People are saying they are waiting on the 2013 model. Well this is going to be like iPhones and Laptops. New better model every other year. If you wait till 2013 you will be thinking well look at the 2014 model Infiniti or 2015 Leaf. When do you make the plung? I will be able to say I had one of the first out all EV.

· Max Reid (not verified) · 2 years ago

Yes, Price drop is a must, otherwise anyone with 35K will just go for Prius Plugin which also gives a high 50 MPG in gas mode while driving on Electric for the 1st 15 miles in every day commute.

· · 2 years ago

Not buring gas right now is worth a lot to me. I don't need a better heater or 6.6kw charging. My car takes 3 hours to charge in the middle of the night so charging would be a waste for our use (which is the average by the way).

I think they'd sell more cars if they made it a point to get several cars into a rental fleet in every good sized city so people could take them home and not be under any pressure to buy like you are on a dealer test drive.

I love my 2011 Leaf SV. No need to wait. Just do it!

· · 2 years ago

Need 6.6kW charging. Waiting...

· iletric (not verified) · 2 years ago

They try to move the metal faster to make space for significanly improved (functionally) 2013. It's blantantly obvious. I'd trade for 2011 for 2013 in an instant. The slow charging IS a big problem. The car is a one-trick-pony when it comes to a moderatly long round trip (around 60-70 miles -- in my case home to SF and back). Plus that winter mileage hog heater.

· kevbo (not verified) · 2 years ago

Canadian lease rate for 36 months with $3000 down is $783.25/month PLUS TAXES. I wonder why nobody is buying them up here???

· Brian Keez (not verified) · 2 years ago

@Smidge204 - why do you have to bust early adopters out as otaku-ish? Very funny.

The new lease deal is great. I DO want that 6.6kw charger, I'm in a Nissan dealership at this very moment waiting for two more bars and it will take an hour. So I would wait for the 2013 if I didn't have the 2011 already.

It's still all about the CHAdeMO fast charger though. Where they at?

· · 2 years ago

In a few years, when current economics woes with me are hopefully more under control, I'd happily buy a used 2011 Leaf. I'm aware of the limitations of the 3.3kWh charger, but can adapt accordingly. We were one of the early test markets here in Tucson and there are around 300 on them on the streets currently. Stands to reason that many current owners will trade up to newer models in the next couple of years and clean first year models will start showing up on the local used lots.

The fellow who helped me organize last year's National Plug In Day festivities in Tucson, Jerry Asher, has driven his 2011 Leaf to all 15 counties in Arizona . . . not once having to use a Level 3 charge (there is only one such EVSE in Arizona right now anyway.)

· · 2 years ago

The missing thing on the Leaf is not a lower price but a micro range extender. In that way there would be no worries anymore on extended trips.
Something that can fit a small package like a wankel or a direct free piston
generator.

· · 2 years ago

I guess everybody's needs are different. What seems to be uncommon is a true knowledge of one's needs. The current Leaf will work for far more people than believe that to be so. The 2013+ Leaf will work for even more people. Until CHAdeMO (or better yet, an even quicker charger) becomes as common as a gas pump, no Leaf will work for 100% of the people 100% of the time. The 2012 Leaf works perfectly for one of my two household cars. This is the base SV model without CHAdeMO (no chargers in upstate NY anyway), and with the current energy hog heater (I live in the snowiest city in the US). The SL would work perfectly for BOTH of my cars IFF the CHAdeMO infrastructure was here.

Note to Nissan: if you install a CHAdeMO at every dealer, I would be able to ditch gas 100%. AND it would alleviate concerns for many future customers. If you really want to sell Leafs, you need to do this!!

· · 2 years ago

@Brian Schwerdt, "I guess everybody's needs are different. What seems to be uncommon is a true knowledge of one's needs. The current Leaf will work for far more people than believe that to be so. The 2013+ Leaf will work for even more people."

Exactly. The main problem is one of education. If 60% of households have two or more cars and a majority of those drive one of the cars less than 40 miles a day, the number of people for whom a LEAF would work as the primary car, for commuting or errand running, must be huge. Of that number there must be tens of thousands who can afford the LEAF with the tax credit and would appreciate that the car is much more fun to drive than a regular ICE or hybrid vehicle. They just don't know it.

· · 2 years ago

"The main problem is one of education."
No, I disagree,
The problem is that the Leaf only fits into a niche as it is today and, even within that niche, one can't count on it meeting your needs all of the time. This relegates the Leaf to a marginal status when compared with an ICE. Education only informs people of the limitations of EVs so that buyers don't make mistakes. I know many people who are well educated about the Leaf (many are on this forum) and realize that its many limitations don't make it worth the expense for them. If you contrast this to nearly any ICE vehicle, where technology and infrastructure exist to overcome most of those limitations, you see how unreasonable it is to hope that a minimal EV like the Leaf can go mainstream at this point.
I hope that the chicken-and-egg limitation to infrastructure rollout will help a bit. Unfortunately, at least here in CA, all efforts thus far have been so poorly misguided and mismanaged that we're destined to have to wait for a while.

· · 2 years ago

That seam to be a lower price then before but i still suggest to postpone any expenditure toward that car till they install an efficient, high technology gasoline or diesel
range extender. Why buy or rent that if you can't have access to the good old farted ice running an electrical generator, this is silly. They made a step forward by adopting electric drive with electrical motors and battery but made an even bigger step backward by removing the ice. All in all this car is inferior then the car it replace. Do like the volt or prokonov truck from russia and let the old farted ice inside the car and add the rest of the electrical technology. Gm did that for almost the same price and their car can go everywhere anytime. It's not everybody that is following the green scene and nobody is following an idea that is to get rid of oil. What normal consumer wants is something better, cheaper then actual cars on the market. Put on the market a car like the volt that is better then the ones that it replace but unfortunattelly that technology while it's better is more costly so again it's a step forward on quality but a step backward on price. A green car for me is a better car with a cheaper price. We saw that with tv, microwave, computers and many more product. In ice technology we saw fuel injection replacing carburators and transistorized ignition replacing magneto with points and small spring, that was better AND cheaper. WE now need something better that a lithium battery and an ice for a better cheaper replacement that each and every customer in the world will adopt. Gm, ford, nissan, u.s.a goverment, exxon, shell, gold traders, newspaper chains, swiss banking, middle east, china, internet providers, coka-cola, formula one, canadian goverment, standard and poors, wall street, etc are all at risk to crumble if something better then battery and ice come to the market.

· · 2 years ago

@ex-EV1 driver, "...you see how unreasonable it is to hope that a minimal EV like the Leaf can go mainstream at this point."

I don't expect the LEAF to go mainstream. I want it to be successful—tens of thousands per year—so that the economies of scale will kick in and the cost will decrease and the range/battery pack will increase. I do fine with zero "infrastructure" in my area and my conditions are vastly more challenging than those of most drivers. More public charge stations would be nice but they aren't a panacea when it comes to EVs going mainstream, if it ever happens.

If that doesn't happen, I guess I am happy I finally got my EV after years of waiting (I put in my solar panels years ago as "phase 1" of a future electric car). I get to drive oil-free, too bad about everybody else who can't be bothered.

· Frank J Perruccio (not verified) · 2 years ago

A step in the right direction.

Manufacturers have to start acting like they want to sell EVs.

Charging infrastructure needs to improve now.

A huge number of multi car households can easily utilize an EV for commuting, and errands and stay well within their daily ranges.

EVs are the hot new tech.

· · 2 years ago

@ex-EV1: "The problem is that the Leaf only fits into a niche as it is today"

Rather than debate this point, I am going to argue that said niche is much larger than 10-20k vehicles per year. The "niche" you speak of is easily 100k+ vehicles per year. Those are vehicles that could easily be replaced with a Leaf (or similar) today, and still meet the same needs. As dpgcolorado points out, that's plenty for economies of scale to kick in, simultaneously increasing functionality and decreasing prices. Of course, those people have to want the car first, and that's not going to happen without education.

Infrastructure, while not perfect, is a red herring for EVs since 90% of the needed infrastructure is in place (i.e. home charging). Contrast that to any alternative - CNG, Propane, Hydrogen, etc.

· · 2 years ago

@Brian Keez - Please believe me when I say I spent nearly two minutes trying to think of a more appropriate term :) The zeal and infatuation of some early adopters for all things EV really can't be described more succinctly. I really did not mean it in a derogatory way.

· Steven (not verified) · 2 years ago

It seems to me the rule of thumb for describing the niche for EVs with the range of the LEAF is pretty simple: if your transportation needs don't exceed their range more than two or three trips a year, go EV now! The 2011 certainly has some design problems. But they are hardly show-stoppers. I frankly could care less whether it takes me 6 hours or 3 hours to 100% charge my LEAF - something I only do once a week anyhow.

I do wish Nissan would do a software upgrade that would just allow 2011 LEAF owners to turn off the damn heater-hog! But with the return of 100 degree temps to Tucson there is once again nothing standing between my LEAF and the top of Mt. Lemmon.

P.S. If we are taking anybody to task, how about Plugin Cars? I thought I read it religiously. Did I miss the article(s) describing what is coming in the 2013 LEAF?

· Steven (not verified) · 2 years ago

It seems to me the rule of thumb for describing the niche for EVs with the range of the LEAF is pretty simple: if your transportation needs don't exceed their range more than two or three trips a year, go EV now! The 2011 certainly has some design problems. But they are hardly show-stoppers. I frankly could care less whether it takes me 6 hours or 3 hours to 100% charge my LEAF - something I only do once a week anyhow.

I do wish Nissan would do a software upgrade that would just allow 2011 LEAF owners to turn off the damn heater-hog! But with the return of 100 degree temps to Tucson there is once again nothing standing between my LEAF and the top of Mt. Lemmon.

P.S. If we are taking anybody to task, how about Plugin Cars? I thought I read it religiously. Did I miss the article(s) describing what is coming in the 2013 LEAF?

· · 2 years ago

@Steven,
Your rule of thumb misses an entire segment of the market, namely multi-car households. My family and I exceed the Leaf's range 1-2 times A MONTH. At the same time, my wife and I both have a car, and when we do exceed the Leaf's range, we're together anyway. Therefore, my car NEVER needs to exceed the Leaf's range. It's this mentality that requires consumer education.

· · 2 years ago

@Steven, Some of us hang out at mynissanleaf.com and the 2013 LEAF specs have been much discussed there. We tend to lose track of whether or not the info has been posted here. Per Mark Perry of Nissan:
"A 6.6Kw charger will be an option." (No, it won't be available as a retrofit for older cars due to considerable technical changes.)

Other reported changes for 2013:
more efficient heater, perhaps using a heat pump
additional exterior colors
a darker interior color
optional leather interior
a third "S" model at a lower price point that lacks nav system, cruise control and the like.

How much of this will come to pass remains to be seen. It isn't known whether the 2013s coming from Japan will have all the new features or whether they will be introduced at Smyrna in December. We should find out more in a few months as the 2013 models are announced.

· · 2 years ago

@Brian - The market segment you describe may be bigger than I realize but for some couples the logistics of sharing are just too much effort. And then there is the case of the odd couple: the geek and the technophobe who just happen to live together.

Actually, I intended my rule of thumb for someone wanting to own just one car and trying to decide if a LEAF makes sense. I think it does - IF your daily commute doesn't exceed the LEAF's range more than 2 or 3 times a year. If you are planning to roll up some serious mileage - and for some strange reason want to drive instead of fly - I'd bet it makes financial sense to roll those miles up one someone else's car, like a rental company's. My rule won't work for people who just like to get in their cars and drive for hours on end. But how many of them are there, really? (There might be a lot more if they were driving LEAFs.)

@dgpcolorado - Thanks! I still haven't seen anything that would make me want to trade in my 2011. Would it be possible to improve a LEAF's climbing range, say with a bigger motor (or gearing changes - if there is such a thing)?

· shaun (not verified) · 2 years ago

From a current leaf owner
For MOST potential buyers this is great, and IMO you can go with the cheaper SV (never yet used my L3 port)
I've never had a situation where a 6.6kw l2 charge would have affected me. I don't care if it's done at 2;30 am or 5 am
I've never needed any heated wheel/battery. Depends where you live.

· Paul Scott (not verified) · 2 years ago

Wearing more than one hat here...

As a long time LEAF and RAV owner, I've never worried about range. When there were two of us, we had a Honda Insight for long distance. Now, it's just the LEAF for me. I've averaged over 100 miles per charge for the past 14K miles. Sure, there are places I don't go, but it's rarely a problem given the 100 mile range. Besides, I have several friends with hybrids who will trade should I need one.

As a LEAF salesman, I sure have noticed a big drop in sales the past few months. I haven't done much advertising, so I'm going to try that now. I suspect that will bring a few to the table. Most folks are completely unaware of the car. It amazes me that they haven't learned about it, but that comes from being so close to the industry for so long. It feels everyone should know what I know by now.

I can assure you, though, that once you get someone in the car for a test drive, it pretty much closes the deal. Also, the best source of buyers are from referrals. Just delivered one today to a musician who did the music for the Polar Bear ad. That was nice.

As a board member of Plug In America, I'm concerned, but not overly so. I know the end game is electric. What I don't know is how fast we'll get there. I sure didn't anticipate this gap in demand, but it's just temporary. The 25,000 current EV drivers are telling the auto surveys their Volt or LEAF is the best car they've ever owned. This is going to be like the iPod, but given the high dollar value, it'll just take more time to get there.

Now if Romney wins and removes the federal tax credit, all bets are off.

· · 2 years ago

@Paul Scott,
I don't believe your personal testimony is particularly ideal. My understanding from the lore surrounding your RAV4EV is that your annual mileage was well below that of the average driver in America. Therefore, I would classify you as an urbanite who is willing to pay a lot of extra $$$ to do the right thing. Your vehicle usage doesn't come near where one can start financially justifying its high purchase cost.
Additionally, you live in an area with some of the highest concentration of public EV charging in the world.
I recommend that you step back from your own world and look at the world in which most of your potential customers live in.

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