How Many Plug-in Cars Were Sold in January? 408

· · 3 years ago

We've followed the stories about the first customers for the Nissan LEAF and the first owner of the Chevy Volt.

We've monitored the reports about delays, reasons we should chill out about it, and promises that production and distribution of the first electric cars will accelerate and go nationwide.

And now, where the rubber hits the road, PluginCars.com can report the total number of sales/leases for the Volt and LEAF, in January 2011, the first full months of sales. It's 408. That's 321 Chevy Volts and 87 Nissan LEAFs.

In December, it was 326 Volts and 19 LEAFs. So, we're making some progess. As of Jan. 31, 2011, there were 753 drivers of these electric cars on U.S. roads. Only 999,247 to go by 2015 to meet President Obama's goal.

We will report the full month of sales of not only electric cars, but hybrids and diesels in the HybridCars.com monthly sales dashboard. The report should be ready tomorrow.

By the way, it looks like Mercedes is also reporting two sales of the B-Class F-Cell in January. That's a 100 percent increase from last month's single sale of the F-Cell electric car.

Correction: Nissan sold 19 LEAFs in Dec. 2010, not 87 as we previously posted.

Comments

· Nick (not verified) · 3 years ago

Assuming that Leaf number is US only not US + Japan. Correct? It is exciting that they are starting to hit driveways but I bet more Ferrari's were sold in January.

· · 3 years ago

Wow, Volt sales peaked in December and were down 2.4% in January! :-) I think you have the Dec LEAF sales number wrong. I thought the PR said it was 19 not 87.

· · 3 years ago

Brad, Thank you for reporting!

· · 3 years ago

@Indyflick - Good catch. Meant to type 19, not 87. This month's tally is 87 for LEAF sales. Thanks.

· sjLEAF (not verified) · 3 years ago

Are the LEAFs at 2000/month that Nissan is making going into Japan then?

· · 3 years ago

What is going on with Nissan? I thought they would be crushing the volt numbers but they seem to be struggling.

· · 3 years ago

Nissan is pumping cars into Japan. Their tax rebate runs out in March & has not been extended. Nissan by some estimate has delivered 2,000 Leafs in Japan.

· · 3 years ago

EVNow,
thanks for the interesting info!

· Anonymous (not verified) · 3 years ago

Meanwhile, in January 2011 GM sold 14,806 full sized SUVs (Escalade, Tahoe, Suburban, Avalanche, Yukon). And Nissan sold 1907 full sized SUVs (Armada, and QX).

So for every single plug-in electric vehicle sold by GM and Nissan in January 2011 - they sold 22 full sized SUVs (whose combined city/highway fuel economy figures range from 10 to 17 mpg).

And I would venture that *most* of the plug-in vehicles were sold to people who already had fairly fuel efficient vehicles - I know a few of the higher profile sales were to people already driving electrics (like the family that has a Volt, a LEAF, and a plug-in converted Prius).

We have a long way to go in this country... But it's a start!

· · 3 years ago

Ten years ago there were no (zero, zip, nada!) electric cars sold in America. In fact, GM was busy confiscating its EV1s from happy leasers and crushing them for scrap. Wow! Its now 2011 and we actually have manufacturers selling EVs to consumers. I never thought that I would live to see this day. It's only taken, what, 100 years since EVs were more popular than gasoline cars (1911)? If Nissan can sell 20000 LEAFs this year, and double that amount every year after, then in 5 years they should be able to sell 320,000 EVs. Thats what I call a good start, dont you think?

· VAmom (not verified) · 3 years ago

I am pleased to report that at least one of the new Volts will be replacing my husband's gas guzzling sports car. Of course, someone else will soon be driving that car, but that is someone who would have driven a guzzler anyway. Our Volt is currently in queue at the assembly plant and will be completed in approximately 8 weeks!! I'm "electrified" with excitement!!

· hybrid cars (not verified) · 3 years ago

Until either volume reduces the costs and the end price for a buyer, or some new technology comes on the market reducing prices, there are going to be only minimal sales for these vehicles. If you are looking for a cheap car to drive, you have to look at all aspects of what make it inexpensive. And a car that gets even twice the fuel economy of another, but costs two or three times that of a conventional economy car is going to have a tough go selling much.

Hopefully it will meet critical mass sooner rather than later and won't need government rebates just to justify its existence.

· hybrid cars (not verified) · 3 years ago

When we see an electric get down to 15 to 20,000 bucks, that's when you'll see sales jump.

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