Hints about Pricing and MPG for Mitsubishi Outlander Plug-in Hybrid

By · February 11, 2013

New Mitsubishi Outlander

Mitsubishi Motors U.K. last week launched the new Outlander crossover SUV, promising that the forthcoming plug-in hybrid version will arrive in the U.K. by June.

The European Commission has not yet issued official pricing or fuel economy numbers, but Lance Bradley, Mitsubishi Motors U.K. managing director, said he expected around 150 miles per gallon—perhaps meaning in a best-case scenario. In the generous fuel efficiency test cycle in Japan, where the Outlander PHEV went on sale in January, the model earned a rating of about 125 miles per gallon.

Bradley said pricing would be “highly competitive.”

The Outlander PHEV is the first four-wheel-drive seven-seat plug-in hybrid. It’s expected to go on sale in the United States in 2014. The model is capable of about 30 miles of all-electric range, and another 250 or so miles using internal combustion. It can travel at speeds up to about 75 miles per hour strictly using electric propulsion.

The plug-in hybrid SUV will go on sale in Australia in June 2013. Paul Unerkov, Mitsubishi Australia vice-president, hinted that the pricing will be between $40,000 to $50,000—which converts to about U.S $41,000 to $53,000.

"This will put future technology in the driveways of mums and dads today,'' Unerkov said, referring to the relatively affordable price tag, and the ability of the plug-in model to travel long distances without requiring a charge. "Over a year, we aim to sell them in the thousands, not the hundreds,'' he said.

Comments

· · 1 year ago

Seven-seat plug-in? Are you sure about that? I heard elsewhere that only the five-seat version would come with a plug. Either way it's a game-changer, but a seven-seater would be huge!

· · 1 year ago

This is another situation where prices abroad do not convert directly to US prices. Australia has notoriously high car prices. I'm not sure if it's due to taxes or some other reason, but I looked up the i-MIEV pricing in Australia and US. The AUS MSRP is $48,800 without NAV. The USA MSRP for the SE with NAV is $31,975. The specs show the US model has a wider track, so the AUS model is probably the slightly smaller global model, not the US model. In any case, given the over 50% price bump in Australia on the i, the price for the Outlander PHEV looks very appealing - probably an MSRP below $35,000 in the states.

· · 1 year ago

"price for the Outlander PHEV looks very appealing - probably an MSRP below $35,000 in the states."

I seriously doubt that. But if I am wrong, then it is great for all the plugin fans out there and I would be certainly interested in buying one myself. Bu the size of battery, motors and size/weight would easily push this SUV into the mid $40k price range before incentive. With CA and Federal Tax incentives, it is possible that price will drop down to $35k (with $7,500 Federal and $1,500 CA).

We shall see.

· · 1 year ago

@ Mike I

Australia has notoriously high prices cause we get ripped off when we buy cars. The prices also can change a lot. I remember wanting to buy a Golf GTI when I arrived in Australia over 20 years ago and it was over $50,000. For some reason Golfs are now much cheaper in the the $25,000 price bracket.

I think it is the crazy duty on some cars. Japanese cars or cars built under licence ie some fords and holdens (GM) are quite cheap but other cars are ridiculous. If the outlander plug in was 40k it would be bargain of the century over here I suspect it will be at least 50k. Actually the petrol one basic model starts at 32k so I wouldn't be surpised if the plug in is nearer to 60k

The Nissan leaf is over 50k, the Volt over 60k and the I-Miev over 50k (plus that is the little skinny one not the american one). None are advertised at all though we see a lot for the Cruze and at lot of them are on the road now. I just checked their prices 22-30k which is really good. 38k for a 16k/w battery what a bargain not.

· · 1 year ago

I predict that 2014 will be the year of the EREV.
We have this, the first SUV plug in, and we have the announcement by VW that their emphasis will be on them, not pure electrics, with a Volt like range of 35-40EV miles.
The Golf and the Passat PHEVs are coming over the next couple of years, as are Audi versions.

· · 1 year ago

Does anyone know when we will actually get to do orders here in the US?

· · 1 year ago

This gives the announced price of Outlander PHEV in all the markets.

http://www.insideoutlander.com/pricing

In Japan it is at the equivalent of $38k for the base model. That is encouraging since US prices are usually lower than Japanese prices for EVs.

Given where Energi, PIP & Volt are prices, I expect Outlander PHEV to be between $30k and $40k. Base model being $35k is quite likely, with useful options taking it closer to $40k.

· · 1 year ago

If the Outlander undercuts the Volt in price, I don't see how it could be anything but a wild success.

· · 1 year ago

"If the Outlander undercuts the Volt in price, I don't see how it could be anything but a wild success."

It also has to get 30+ MPG highway in charge-sustaining mode. That is to say it beats the Highlander Hybrid/RX450h when the plug-in charge is gone. That would make it an engineering success in my mind. Sales success will of course depend on the general public's reaction.

· · 1 year ago

Mitsubishi with far fewer dealers will have a difficult time beating Volt in sales. In brand perceptions, Mitsu is at the rock bottom as well.

Infact, Mitsu sells so few cars in the US, frequently there are rumors of them pulling out of US. Outlander will be their "last bet" - so they have to really make it click to stay in business in the US. That would indicate fairly aggressive pricing, IMO.

About Mitsu needing 30+ MPG in CS mode ... personally that is not a deal breaker for me. Vast majority of our driving is under 40 miles a trip. So, CS MPG is not that critical for total gas usage in a year.

· · 1 year ago

EVNow,

From an aero perspective, it looks like Mitsu has paid some attention, so they should be able to beat Toyota in highway MPG. However, you're right about how critical the CS MPG is - the Volt doesn't need Prius level CS MPGs to save you a lot of gas over the full year. In my situation though, I would buy this car to be THE road trip car. All our other driving would be possible in a Leaf or Focus EV.

Your points about Mitsubishi's reputation and brand perception are well made. I paused to think about this vehicle's quality and reliability the first moment I heard about it.

· · 1 year ago

@Mike I,

So you already have a Leaf & FFE ? I'd get rid of one of them for the Outlander. If you want something purely for long distance travel, then CS MPG would be important.

· · 1 year ago

@EVNow,

No EV yet. Just saying a "city car" would suffice with the Outlander as the long distance vehicle. My 2001 Passat GLX Wagon really needs replacing and I can't find any car that I like with the same utility - plug-in or not. I'm actually leaning toward a RAV4 EV, but would have to borrow or rent a SUV or minivan for trips to LA or Tahoe from Silicon Valley. It could handle our regular trips to SF without destination charging.

· · 1 year ago

I dunno why Mitsubishi have such a bad reputation in the US.
Here in the UK they are generally regarded as reliable, is somewhat niche, cars.
They come 11th in our reliability index:
http://www.reliabilityindex.com/manufacturer

I think perhaps here they fill some of the gap which vehicles like the F150 occupy in the States, which their pick ups providing some of the same functionality with more reasonable fuel costs.

They are a fairly popular choice by builders etc.

· · 1 year ago

I dunno why Mitsubishi have such a bad reputation in the US.
Here in the UK they are generally regarded as reliable, is somewhat niche, cars.
They come 11th in our reliability index:
http://www.reliabilityindex.com/manufacturer

I think perhaps here they fill some of the gap which vehicles like the F150 occupy in the States, which their pick ups providing some of the same functionality with more reasonable fuel costs.

They are a fairly popular choice by builders etc.

· · 1 year ago

It's pointless to say 125MPGe ... there's 2 numbers that matter, all-electric range at freeway speeds, and mpg in charge sustaining mode.

Regardless, this car is looking good, and I hope it does incude a foldable 3rd row of seats.

· · 1 year ago

Interesting observation about brand perception. Chevy doesn't exactly have a great reputation for quality either. I've seen far too many Chevrolets fall apart (pretty much all of them) to be particularly inspired to plop down $32k on one.

· · 1 year ago

@Brian Schwerdt · Yes, Chevy has terrible reputation, atleast until a few years ago. It would far easier for me to convince my wife to get a Mitsu than a Chevy (or even a Ford !). Some people just don't want to by domestics, still.

· · 1 year ago

@Brian Schwerdt - This site shows a
5 seat configuration for the Outlander PHEV

· · 1 year ago

Mitsubishi blew it not offering the 3rd row seat and making it happen.

They lost my sell because of it.

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