GM's EV1 Lives On, With EV2 on the Way

By · July 03, 2013

Ohio State's EV1

Ohio State's EV1 looks good, but the drivetrain is off in other cars. (Jim Motavalli photo)

I walked around the corner at Ohio State’s Center for Automotive Research (CAR) and there it was: a bright red General Motors EV1, the first mass-market electric car in the modern era. It was great to see it again, although looking smaller than I remembered it. It must be at least a decade since I’ve seen one.

As we all know, most of the 1,117 EV1s produced between 1996 and 1999 (and finally taken off the road by GM in 2003) were crushed. You may have heard, they made a movie about it. But a few cars, 40 some say, were spared an early death and sent to universities and research centers—minus controllers for the main drive, brakes, power steering and such. They were supposed to be studied and taken apart by students, not resurrected.

Chelsea Sexton, the EV expert who starred in Who Killed the Electric Car? and knows the EV1 program intimately, has located perhaps 20 of the cars sent into the wider world, and is tracking VIN numbers. "The only EV1 not adulterated before donation is at the Smithsonian, which only accepts 'intact specimens,'" she said.

No Driving, Now

The Ohio State car looks clean, but it’s not a driver. I shot some video of it:



Don Butler, an OSU research director, told me the university’s had the car 10 years. “It’s used primarily for research,” he said. “One of the terms is that we can’t drive it on public roads. We got the EV1 with the inverter disabled, though we were able to un-disable it. But parts of the traction system went into other cars we were working on, including our EcoCar contenders.”

Other colleges with EV1s include Western Washington, the University of Wisconsin, Brigham Young (which built an ultra-capacitor-based drag racing car with John Wayland of White Zombie fame as a consultant) and Penn State. The first two, remarkably, are now driving around.

A Rebirth Odyssey

Beginning in September of 2004, the Wisconsin team had quite an odyssey. The team started by getting a 380-volt nickel-metal-hydride battery together using parts of an old pack from the Ford Ranger EV (yes, it fit) and then getting the rest of the cells donated by the University of West Virginia.

They next went through an odyssey with the controller, trying a Solectria unit from the FutureTruck competition that didn’t work (only making the motor rattle and hum) because “the control boards were four revisions apart.” Finally, Ballard Power Systems donated a working controller, but the student team had to drastically modify the entire suspension/motor subframe to accommodate it.

There was tons of programming work to do, too, and a big setback when everything was in place but the integrated powertrain wouldn’t “wake up.” It turned out to have been installed backwards. By the time that was fixed it was August of 2005, and the EV1 was finally running and driving. Chelsea Sexton got to pilot it. "The experience was bittersweet," she said. "Very nostalgic, from the start-up cascade of dashboard lights to same familiar smell."

I’m sure the students involved got more hands-on training than any classroom could offer. Here's some video of that car on the road, with Chelsea at the wheel:



Another One Up and Running

The Washington car was resurrected in 2007 after an intensive round of hardware and software work from students, faculty and a now-defunct electric car company called EV Bones. Sexton says it's the closest car to stock, missing only one significant original part.

There are still occasional EV1 sightings, including one that shows up clearly on old Google Earth maps, parked on a back street in Richmond, California. But a really cool corollary to all this is the EV2 now under construction by the afore-mentioned Wayland. Yes, an EV2.

Get Ready for the EV-2

Wayland has taken an original EV1 transaxle with motor and transplanted it into his 2000 Honda Insight hybrid (a car known as the “Silver Streak”) which he says was modeled somewhat on the EV1. He’s also found four rare-as-hen’s-teeth EV1 wheels (a 2.5-year adventure) and after modifying the hubs and suspension, has those on the car, too.

EV2

The car at left is what the Silver Streak will look like when done. The other one you know. Family resemblance? (John Wayland graphic)

Wayland (who's had some experience behind the wheel of EV1s) thinks the “EV-2,” with a custom-made 71.5-kilowatt-hour battery pack (featuring Dow Kokam cells), will be good for 400 miles on a charge. It helps that the original Insight weighed only 1,800 pounds. The Silver Streak should weigh only slightly more than the original EV1. “I’m flipping the bird to GM for crushing the EV1, and doing the same to Honda for making fun of electric cars when they introduced the Insight,” Wayland said.

The EV-2 is now 80 percent complete, with a made-in Oregon Rinehart inverter one of the highlights of the spec-sheet. Wayland expects it to be on the road in August or September. “Stuffing 1,000 pounds of lithium-ion into a Honda Insight is quite a challenge,” he said. Nobody would doubt that. By the way, the Silver Streak is getting handmade “EV2” badges based on the original.

The spirit of the EV1 lives on!

Comments

· · 1 year ago

I love the 400 miles of range. Quite obviously if he went to the trouble to put those batteries in the car, the added range is important to him.... So why don't other manufacturers do this? Tesla remains the only one who is even attempting to put in a decent sized battery... I note that there was lack of interest in tesla's smallest battery, *not* their largest.

· · 1 year ago

This is neat to hear about these EV1s that escaped the crusher and live on. As far as family resemblance goes, I'd have to say that the EV1 looks remarkably similar to the 1991-95 Saturn SL1, which is the car I drive . . .

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/e/eb/1st-Saturn-SL1.jpg

If the EV1 were to have officially launched, it would have been wearing a Saturn nameplate (or so it was stated in the opening minutes of "Who Killed The Electric Car?".)

When my wife bought our '95 SL1 as a low mileage used one a year after being built, we used to see an EV1 parked at the Tucson Saturn dealership while visiting for service checkups. It may have been the one that Bob Oldfather (owner of the local Bookman's used bookstores) drove back then.

· · 1 year ago

Ford built about a thousand of the fourth generation Think EV in the early 2000's, and most are still driving on the streets of Norway (and a few other European countries). Ford considered crushing them also but eventually shipped the US cars back to Norway. There are a few thousand of the fifth generation running around now.

Today I see about 4 of the old generation for sale in Norway and over a dozen of the new ones:

http://www.finn.no/finn/car/used/result?ENGINE/FUEL=4&sort=0&CAR_MODEL/M...

The older Thinks are a popular candidate for upgrade to Lithium Ion batteries in Germany and other countries, but Norway regulations do not allow it so they still have the original flooded NiCad at "home".

We have great support in the US from Elkhart based service for Think, with about 400 cars here and used prices around $13,000. 75 mph top speed, great AC and more range than a Leaf makes the newer Think quite different than the older one.

· · 1 year ago

A 400 mile range is totally doable - though the EV1 had a Cd of ~0.20 while the Insight is 0.25. That will come down a little with a full grill block, but it won't likely equal the EV1. Range is largely dependent on the Cd of the car.

· · 1 year ago

I think it is time for most of us to move on from the EV1 to something much better today... (Tesla).

· · 1 year ago

"Quite obviously if he went to the trouble to put those batteries in the car, the added range is important to him."

Wayland says in his blog that he wanted to break some records. That's why he's taking the past 2 years of his free time to do this.

As for why other manufacturers aren't doing this? Well, technically speaking Tesla already has. Their 85 kWh Model S has a slightly lower drag coefficient (0.24 vs this car's 0.25) and a larger battery. So we can take Wayland's estimate of a 400 mile range with a lump of salt. Nevermind the fact that he's not even finished and hasn't actually proven the range of the car yet.

· · 1 year ago

it's a pity, GM didn't bang out a EV2 themselves. The vehicle could have been done for very low cost by reusing the EV1 design work, and making ten thousand, to put on the road, and get some data,
ahead of the Volt.

· · 1 year ago

jamcl3, Ford was crushing Think City EVs before protests in San Francisco and Oslo brought a negotiated agreement to return the US Thinks to Norway for resale. Out of this dontcrush.com was born. And ultimately Plug In America. (I know my Think City is still driving in western Norway.)

· · 1 year ago

I know its quite insane... but I do wish both historical restored Ev-1's were available to purchase, as well as updated ev1's. I wish the EV2 far, far more success than he imagines. Maybe all of us that own Insights will convert to a 400 mile electric car.

Plug in America, Plug in Cars, DYI-ers and others are owed a debt from American, perhaps, global society for bringing electric cars to the world's attention...

· · 1 year ago

The BraveLittleToaster wrote:

> As for why other manufacturers aren't doing this? Well, technically speaking Tesla already has. Their 85 kWh Model S has a slightly lower drag coefficient (0.24 vs this car's 0.25) and a larger battery. So we can take Wayland's estimate of a 400 mile range with a lump of salt.
>

The Tesla Model S is a fantastic accomplishment, and the top dog 85 kWh model does ~ 275 -300 miles at 55 mph... but that's a long ways off from my 400+ mile prediction for range in Silver Streak. The Model S's cd of .24 may be fractionally better than my Insight's .25, but it's frontal area is substantially larger at 28.4 sq. ft. compared to the Insight's compact 20.4 sq. ft. In terms of the amount of hp it takes to push a car against the wind, it's the cdA that counts (cd X frontal area), not just the cd

The cdA for a stock Insight is a very low 5.1 (mine will be a bit lower) while the much larger Tesla Model S is 6.8 - that's a huge difference. It's another huge difference to lug close to 4785 lb up even mild grades, compared to 2800 lbs.! In addition to the Model S's hefty curb weight, its fat 245 section non-LRR tires are heavy at 24.5 lbs. each, and four ~ 27 lb. 19 X 9 wheels to rotate, and you can see why it needs an average of 270-310 Wh per mile to cruise at 55 mph - I was in a Model S recently and the touch screen efficency display confirmed these numbers.

Now, let's look at that "take Wayland's estimate of a 400 mile range with a lump of salt" thing, shall we?

In stark contrast to the much bigger, heavier and far less efficent Model S, my EV2 Insight will weigh a full 2000 lbs. less at ~ 2800 lbs., it has ultra light and narrow (4" wide) EV1 wheels that weigh just 8.2 lbs. and skinny 165'65/14 LRR tires that weigh 11.3 lbs. each. That's 19.5 lbs. of mass to spin at each corner vs the Model S's near 53 lbs. at each corner. The original EV1 used 167 Wh per mile to cruise at 60 mph, and about 155 Wh per mile at 55 mph. I am predicting a conservative 170 Wh per mile for my EV2 at 55 mph... way less than the Model S's 278 Wh per mile! Though the Tesla sports 85 kWh of storage capacity, it's being drawn down at 278 Wh per mile... 85 kWh / 278 Whe per mile = 305 miles. Silver Streak's 71.5 kWh pack / 170 Wh per mile = 420 miles.

> Nevermind the fact that he's not even finished and hasn't actually proven the range of the car yet.

I am known for being quite accurate in my performance predictions and am confident my EV2 will easily run 400 miles @ 55 mph. I predicted mid-to-low 10 second ETs for my electric drag car White Zombie a year before the car hit the track - it's first weekend out, it ran 10.54, then 10.258 the next night - no grain of salt needed!

· · 1 year ago

@Plasmaboy,

Thanks for sharing your calculations. I get quite annoyed when people blindly refer to Cd, and completely ignore frontal area. Cd is a coefficient, relating how efficient an object is compared to a cube of the same frontal area.

As for the project, I wish you the best of luck! I've heard of many conversions before, but never one with a 400 mile range.

· · 1 year ago

@Plasmaboy,

Sounds like a great project. Where are you building it?

Is the car going to have full HVAC, and, if so, how much do you estimate it will affect the range?

By the way, you can't really split hairs with Cd, unless both cars are tested in the same wind tunnel. Different tunnels give different results. GM's tunnel will generally produce higher Cd's than others.

· · 1 year ago

I'm a little put off by Wisconsin putting a big Ford sticker on an EV-1 (video). :-0

· · 1 year ago

From Michael:

> Sounds like a great project. Where are you building it?

Portland, Oregon. Motor / transaxle and suspension work has been done locally at FabTek, a strong sponsor of Plasma Boy Racing projects (including White Zombie), while battery and electronics are being done in my backyard EV shop.

> Is the car going to have full HVAC?

Yes, full HVAC. I have put a lot of thought into the system to make it as efficient as possible.

> How much do you estimate it will affect the range?

Today's ICE vehicles are only 30% efficient, so there is an enormous amount of wasted heat energy that simply gets tapped into for the 'H' part of the HVAC system. EVs - especially those with AC drives, are very efficient and make little waste heat (8-10%) - thus, heat has to be created. In most electric conversions, running the heater amounts to a 10-15% hit on range. Though some use warmed-liquid type elements to make hot water for the heater's radiator core (think a home's electric water heater), most draw air past a 1500 watt ceramic element that replaces the heater core radiator, and 1500 watts does a nice job of providing heat in a smaller car. In Silver Streak's case, there's 71.5 kWh of juice to tap into that will give 400+ miles range. The AC drive will consume about 8.6 kW (11 hp) for a 55 mph cruise on level ground, and in a perfectly flat world that's 8.3 hours @ 55 mph = 456 miles. If you ran the 1500 watt heater the entire 8.3 hours, you would consume 12.45 kWh, leaving ~ 59 kWh for propulsion - 59,000 / 8600 = 6.86 hours... 6.86 X 55 mph = 377 miles... about a 17% range hit if the heater was never shut off for close to 7 hours. Factory EVs that have 80-100 miles range and have liquid-cooled AC motors and inverters make about 600-700 watts of waste heat, but it takes about 1/2 hour or so to build up enough of that to be usable to augment the heating needs for passenger warmth, up until that time the 1500-2000 warmed liquid heater most factory EVs employ is in use (the new Leaf uses a heat pump, as did the EV1). Once the interior is warmed up, the 600-700 watts of warmed liquid could be used to keep the temperature cozy... think of a 1500 watt electric space heater turned back to its 'low' setting of 750 watts, and you get the idea. However, with only a 1-2 hour run time this is not done.

Silver Streak's 7-8 hours of run time on the open highway is a different story and makes using the ~ 700 watts of waste heat from the liquid-cooled system plausible. In addition to the car's AC motor and inverter, the coolant also passes through a 9.6 kW liquid-cooled charger, and during long hours of charging there's about 900 watts of waste heat that will warm up that liquid. On cold days following a recharge, the car has warmed liquid ready to augment the heater, and on 50-400 mile road trips the same liquid is warmed by the inverter and AC motor, again augmenting and in most cases, eliminating use of the heater element entirely once the interior is brought up to a comfortable temperature where 700 watts can sustain comfort. Thus, in a 400 mile road trip in cold weather, the 1500 watt element would only be on for the first 1/2 hour or so - then it is shut off and there is zero current being pulled from the pack for heat any longer. 1500 watts for 1/2 hour is .75 kWh out of the battery pack, a little more than 1% of the stored energy! It's safe to assume then, that the heater in Silver Streak will only affect the range by 1%. If the trip follows an over-night charge and the liquid has been pre-heated by the charger's waste heat, you may not even need to use the 1500 element at all.

As to air conditioning... again, comparing it to an ICE, there is so much heat generated by the engine itself warming up the firewall and the car's interior, the torrent of hot air from the radiator fans being blown around and under the car, and a 1200 degree exhaust system right under the passenger compartment, it requires 4-7 hp to run the air conditioner pump and fans to overcome the heat produced by the IC system, let alone hot ambient temperatures! At stop lights when the engine slows down to an idle and the AC isn't as cold, plus there's no longer 55 mph air movement from road travel, the car's interior heats back up.

Silver Streak, like all EVs, doesn't have to fight all that wasted heat, and only has to overcome ambient warm air. At stop lights, it's inverter-driven AC system is still rock'n at full cooling capacity. It's AC motor/compressor uses less than 1 hp - about 600 watts, or .6 kWh per hour of travel. A 7 hour road trip would be 4.2 kWh from the traction pack, leaving 67.3 kWh, or 385 miles (in that perfect world scenario).

In short, the HVAC system will use power and impact range, but in the larger picture, not much to be concerned about. Now, cranking up the 700 watt rms Wayland sound system (draws ~ 1200 watts at full organ-moving power) is another matter :-)

· · 1 year ago

@PlasmaBoy

600 watts doesn't sound like a very big air conditioner. My Volt in Economy Mode is around 1500 watts and I was under the impression that it was the most efficient car Air Conditioner there was. One thing they do under economy mode is keep the evaporation temperature around 55-60 degrees so the coefficient of performance (COP, which is equal to EER/3.413) is very high. Plus they use the full condensor at a part loading, so the condensing temperature is kept low, increasing the refrigerating effect of each pound of refrigerant ciruculating, plus reducing the discharge pressure of the compressor (while increasing the suction pressure, thereby drastically reducing the compression ratio ((not to be confused with "compression ratio" misnomer on ICE's, when they really mean there volumetric ratio)..

In short, what is it? The first law of thermodynamics? or the zeroth? I forget, but in anyevent the thing im thinking of is that there is no free lunch. You have to put some juice in to get a certain amount of cooling out. And the Volt is about as good as it gets, at least in economy mode.

I guess it depends what kinda hip hop u listen to as I wouldn't think anything with constant 1200 watt bass notes would be very musical. Most program material is only a few watts. That's why those 2 farad (2,000,000 microfarad) electrolytics to maintain 13.8 volts with the fancy paint jobs on them work, since the bass note is only temporary if periodic.

· · 1 year ago

@Plasma boy

I think your assumption of inefficiency in an ICE air conditioner is a poor one. The AC condensor on an ICE is always in front of everything so it works with the coldest air, plus the lines are fairly well insulated.

I remember the big Cadillacs used to have 5 ton (60,000 BTU/Hour) air conditioners, so yes it did affect gas mileage a bit. Too much Glass to try to keep the huge interior cool.
I have a 2200 sq ft 4 bedrm house, and a 2 1/2 ton airconditioner which is more than adequate to make the whole place comfortable. So those old cadillac systems could completely cool 2 decent sized houses.

· · 1 year ago

From Blll Howland,

> 600 watts doesn't sound like a very big air conditioner. My Volt in Economy Mode is around 1500 watts > and I was under the impression that it was the most efficient car Air Conditioner there was.

You're right, it's not - it's about the same as a 5000 BTU small room air conditioner, which by the way, draws 600 watts as well (5 amps @ 120vac). Hang the smallest example of a home window air conditioner on the side window of an Insight, turn it on, and see how long it is before you have frost on your ears!

Your Volt is not an electric car, inspite of whatever BS GM tells you it is - 'extended range electric'. The Volt in fact, is a hybrid that in pure electric mode is a 'very short range electric' that has to be rescued by gas. Because it needs to run an IC for anything more than urban driving, it suffers from all the heat expelled by its IC - the same radiated heat off the engine itself, hot air exhausted from the radiator and 1200 degree exhaust system right under the passenger compartment I have already mentioned in my previous comments - so yes, the Volt 'needs' more air conditioner power than a real electric car does. It's sad GM has such horrible marketing and spins things the way they do, because the Volt is an excellent plug-in hybrid. I've driven many, and have frineds that love them - but they are not an electric car - they need gas to get anything above 40 miles or so.

> I think your assumption of inefficiency in an ICE air conditioner is a poor one. The AC condensor on an > ICE is always in front of everything so it works with the coldest air, plus the lines are fairly well >insulated.

I never said the air conditioner of IC system was inefficent or that it didn't work well - I said it had to work much harder to overcome all the heat being made by the ICE. Where the condensor is located or how well its lines are insulated, doesn't change the fact that when the ICE is running it is surrounding and engulfing the passenger cell with huge amounts of heat - a fact that's undeniable. A hotter interior means it takes more air conditioner power to be cooled down... it's a pretty simple concept.

Here's an experiment to do at home, especially if one has an insuated garage as I do. Park your ICE vehicle in the garage after it has been driven around and is fully warmed up, then shut the big door behind it. Go back out an hour later and see if you can stand how hot the garage is! The temp will have risen 30 degress or so - and all of it was with the engine off and just radiated leftover waste heat! Do the same with a new Leaf or or converted electric, and the difference will illustrate things quite well.

· · 1 year ago

From Bill Howland:

> I guess it depends what kinda hip hop u listen to...

Hip Hop is not my style, but having played professionally for 20+ years in my younger days, I appreciate a good system with enough power to replicate the live experience.

> I wouldn't think anything with constant 1200 watt bass notes would be very musical.

Bill, you seem to not be reading my comments fully: "700 watt rms Wayland sound system (draws ~ 1200 watts at full organ-moving power)" Read that '700 watt rms' part - the max power output, not the input power it 'draws' to create it... so there's never even a peak 1200 watt bass note, let alone a constant one.

Bill, my sound system comment was meant to taken as tongue & cheek :-) Still, I get your point. You may not be aware that this same car that is being turned into an EV2, was on the cover of Car Audio and Electronics magazine back in the heyday years in 2001, when I made and competed with the world's first hybrid soundoff car. It won top awards for how musical, clear, and undistorted its system was. Yes, it has enough bass to massage your innards if that's your thing, but it also has a tested and documented frequency response that extends to 18 hz at the bottom end, and very flat up to 16 khz. Those of you reading this who listen to MP3 should disregard any of this :-)

> Most program material is only a few watts. That's why those 2 farad (2,000,000 microfarad)
> electrolytics to maintain 13.8 volts with the fancy paint jobs on them work, since the bass note is only
> temporary if periodic.

Funny you should mention this! I have an electric garden tractor with a fancy paint job, that I built back in the mid-nineties. It's affectionately called 'The Heavy Metal Garden Tractor'. It has a full-blown CD audio system complete with a between-the-legs 8 inch subwoofer :-) Though it is powered by a 36V traction system, it also has a 12V system to support work lights, contactors - and yes, the sound system. A DC-DC converter supplies the juice, but instead of a 12V battery, there's a 1.2 Farad car stereo cap that stores energy to be released on high impact bass notes :-)

· · 1 year ago

@Plasmaboy, thanks for explaining your numbers. There's loads of education to do, even amongst us so-called experts, including Bill and Bravelittletoaster. Instead of attacking other members of the choir, perhaps we can follow John's example to extoll the virtues of electric vehicles, especially ones powered by renewable energy, to EV congregants and soon-to-be congregants.

· · 1 year ago

@plasmaboy,

You have some valid points. However, your reasoning on the Volt part is questionable.

"The Volt in fact, is a hybrid that in pure electric mode is a 'very short range electric' that has to be rescued by gas"

Well, a Leaf running out of range is a "very short range electric" that has to be rescued by gas or diesel in this case on the bed of a tow truck. So, it is ONLY a matter of "electric range". Whether it is 40 miles, 70 miles, 100 miles or 260 miles as in Tesla... There are small BEV that has less than 40 miles of EV range. So, calling Volt a "very short range electric" isn't exactly fair.

If the ICE is really the problem, then in the EV mode of the Volt, the AC should be no different than a BEV.

Now let us talk about your MOST unscientific example:

"Here's an experiment to do at home, especially if one has an insuated garage as I do. Park your ICE vehicle in the garage after it has been driven around and is fully warmed up, then shut the big door behind it. Go back out an hour later and see if you can stand how hot the garage is! The temp will have risen 30 degress or so - and all of it was with the engine off and just radiated leftover waste heat! Do the same with a new Leaf or or converted electric, and the difference will illustrate things quite well."

I call that the biggest BS crap that pretend to be somewhat scientific. That example only makes sense if the ICE is located inside your car cabin. It doesn't. Does it have affect? Yes. Is that effect signficant? Well, that depends on how effective your insulation to your cabin is. A better example is your oven vs the cabinet right next to it. Typical Oven is well insulated and usually the cabin right next to it won't get hot at all (or it shouldn't. Mine doesn't)

ICE might generate a lot of heat, but it doesn't mean those heat will always get into your cabin. Heat only conducts three ways. Convection, conduction and radiation. By insulating the firewall and floor of the car, the amount of heat transferred to the cabin is minimal. Also, with natural convection during driving that heat transfer is even smaller. Most cars have heat shield on the hot exhaust already these days. Firewall is also very well insulated. So, the amount of heat transfer during normal driving is minmal. The majority of the heat is really the radiation heat from the sun and to some extend the convection effect of the hot air in extreme hot climate. Those factors dominates the amount of heat transfer into the cabin. Your example only makes sense if you are stuck in a small enclosed space such as a grarage or parking structure. We all know that is the NOT the case for "driving" scenior.

The environmental effect is FAR greater than what the ICE can generate through the floor of the car and firewall. Don't believe me? Park your hot ICE car in a cold windy day with your engine hot. Measure the temperature every 10 second from before the engine shut off to 10 minutes after the ICE is shut off, you will see the temperature drops linearity with time. That shows the environmental effect is FAR GREATER than the engine bay to cabin heat transfer.

With all that said, it is true that there will be some heat transfer, but that amount might be very small depending on the design of insulation. So, for a properly designed vehicles, ICE contribution to the A/C cooling is minimal comparing to the environmental effect.

· · 1 year ago

@Plasmaboy

The basic problem with your comments is that 1200 degrees.. The atkinson cycle engine exhaust in the volt will not be that hot. If it were, there would be no point in atkinson since at that heat there is still mechanical energy to be recovered.

You also make the erroneous assumption that there is no heat shielding/insulation anywhere.

Modern Marvel Fan mentioned the other errors.

· · 1 year ago

@meinnovations

Plasmaboy didn't seem that upset with my constructive criticism.

The reason I comment is that I feel I have a different slant on things and I also own 2 very different EV's (and I'm sorry, Plasmaboy is just plain wrong about the Volt - so you should be criticizing him not me for dishing out inaccurate information - if you don't believe me, ask Modern Marvel Fan). How many Ev's have you paid for?

Over 97% of my miles driven in the volt were in full EV mode, in all kinds of weather, (although, the car is much more efficient in very cold weather with the engine running- and I'm not arguing that point : Northeasterners worry about such things that southern californians don't give a second glance).

As far as claiming to be an expert, or 'so-called expert', I've never claimed to be expert on anything. I put out statements and then defend them as necessary. People view my knowledge on the subject by the answers I give and whether I can field any comments made by others. Since people have no problem disecting everything I say, I'm allowed to make comments on vehicles I have bought and paid for.

Another thing meinnovations, just because a person uses strong volume to make a point, doesn't mean that the point has any validity.

Plasmaboy, to his credit, at least attempts to talk about each point as raised, and does not throw things out categorically as such pseudo experts (mostly young kids I'd wager) have in the past.

· · 1 year ago

@plasmaboy,

Thank you for your detailed responses. Great project! Do you have a blog for people to follow along?

I can confirm that heat soak from an ICE is not trivial. My car has an A/C outlet temperature about 10F above ambient. Obviously the air conditioner has to remove that extra heat.

The pure EV also has the advantage of having a condenser that does not have its air flow blocked by an engine radiator. Although there may be a battery and inverter cooling radiator present, it may be placed off to the side or at the least have a far lower fin density.

My experience is solar loading has the biggest effect on A/C performance as far as cabin comfort. Check your A/C settings while traveling on a hot night compared to daytime.

· · 1 year ago

Plasmaboy, Them are fightin words. For most of the year I get around 50 mile range on my Volt. Sounds like an electric car, drives like an electric car. Call it what you like, it is an electric car.
You got that all wrong. You may be thinking about the Toyota Prius plugin. Now that is not an electric car. Translogic reviewed the Prius plugin and noted that you would have to take off like a snail in order to keep the gas motor off, and keep it under 60 mph.
I can cruise at 100 mph in my Volt without using a drop of gas. When you start putting down vehicles, start with the weakest. Put down the Prius plugin.

· · 1 year ago

@Mileater

I forget who said it, but they made the comment that "if you drive 97% of the time in your volt on the battery, and just ignore the 3% of the time that you aren't, then you are essentially driving a decent sized totally electric vehicle not unlike a Tesla S for half the cost...."... Well put.

· · 1 year ago

@ Jim Motavalli
From Wikipedia: "The University of West Virginia was an educational authority formed by the West Virginia Legislature on July 1, 1989, to oversee the operation of the state's graduate and doctoral degree-granting institutions. It was abolished on June 30, 2000." Pretty sure you meant West Virginia University. Also, OSU is officially known as THE Ohio State University, but it's cool, most people don't know that.

As for the rest, Go Plasmaboy Go and, a series hybrid is a series hybrid even if you seldom fire up the ICE. Note that the same basic technology has been used for several decades in the rail industry, and we call that a Diesel locomotive.

One wonders how much a Volt's range could be extended by chucking out its range extender and replacing it with more battery...

· · 1 year ago

@Plasmaboy

What do you expect your EV2 to cost once you get it done? And how much to make a second one without the special tires and use something close? I love the 400 mile range as well. Go for it, Plasmaboy!

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