Ford Prices 2013 Fusion Energi at $39,495

By · November 23, 2012

Ford Fusion Energi

Ford this week released pricing details on the 2013 Fusion Energi. The plug-in hybrid will hit dealerships in early 2013 and is expected to carry a base price of $39,495, excluding tax credits and delivery charges. The top trim Fusion Energi Titanium will be priced at $40,995. The entire Fusion Energi lineup will be eligible for a federal tax credit of an estimated $3,750, which will drop the effective price of the base SE Luxury trim Fusion Energi down to a reasonable $35,745.

The 2013 Fusion Energi is expected to qualify for a federal tax credit of $3,750 and up to an additional $1,500 in state incentives. Even before the discounts, the Fusion Energi is priced slightly above—$39,495 versus $39,145—its most direct competitor, the Chevrolet Volt. But it's the after-discount price that makes the Volt seem like a bargain. For example, if you factor in the federal tax credit, the Volt can be bought for an effective price of only $31,645, while the base Fusion Energi costs at least $35,745. That's a difference of $4,100.

The Fusion Energi has a fifth seat—whereas the Volt is a four-seater. But is it truly worth an additional $4,100? Buyers will also consider the relative cost and benefits of the Fusion Energi, versus the Ford C-Max Energi, a five-seat plug-in hybrid that's substantially smaller than the Fusion Energi—and costs only $29,995 after incentives.

The 2013 Fusion, regardless of powertrain choice, is one of the most stylish midsize sedans available today and that alone could convince buyers to hand over the extra cash. If styling doesn't drive sales, then Ford thinks the Fusion Energi's specs will. According to Ford, the Fusion Energi will be rated at or above 100 MPGe and will offer approximately 20 miles of electric-only range. Additionally, Ford claims the Fusion Energi will get at least 40 mpg in extended-range mode.

Comments

· · 2 years ago

"which will drop the effective price of the base SE Luxury trim Fusion Energi down to a reasonable $35,745."

I don't think that's reasonable, and I think there's a lot of shell shock as folks are getting this news. Not only is the net price >$4k more expensive than a Volt, its almost $8k more expensive than the Fusion Hybrid which gets better mpg.

I think Ford should have priced it at $34,995 at the most which would work out to $31,245 after the tax credit making it $1,250 less than a Volt and only $3,250 more than a Fusion Hybrid instead of $7,750 more.

Ford is counting on styling, a 5th seat, and MPGe to sell it. I'm still waiting to see how much trunk space is lost to keep a 5th seat. I carry cargo a lot more often than I carry 5 people. And total electric miles I think will prove to matter more than MPGe. I hope there will be a "FordStats.net" equivalent. Even if the MPGe rating is higher I will bet Volts will get better real world overall efficiency and most certainly use less gas.

Something else not being talked about too much is that the Energi's are using air-cooling for the batteries, not liquid cooling like the Volt and Focus EV. I don't see how Ford can justify this MSRP.

· Anonymous (not verified) · 2 years ago

This is too expensive. I think they are targetting Volt, but this vehicle has only 20 mile electric range. If automakers think of milking money, then people will end up buying smaller cars like Fiesta, Sonic, Fit, Prius C and so on.

Lets hope the lower price of upcoming Leaf will pull down the price of EVs, Plugins & Hybrids.

· CharlesF (not verified) · 2 years ago

OK, Mr. Energy Thief, here is a justification for why the Fusion is $4K more then the Volt. The non-hybrid/non-plug in Fusion is about $4K more than the Cruze. Why would you expect the plug in versions of each to be closer in price?

· Anonymous (not verified) · 2 years ago

Here is why it is priced at almost $40K, because it is priced in a way so the sales will be minimum. Because Ford will lose lot of money even at $40K, so why bother selling more and lose more money? I mean Ford is not owned by government, so they have to behave a little more responsible.
This is the opinion of the battery team at Ford headed by Ted J. Miller!

· Phil Griffith (not verified) · 2 years ago

I think the Ford Fusion having a range of 20 miles/pure electric puts it out of the market for me. I want more range than the Volt as it is.

· Chris C. (not verified) · 2 years ago

The anonymous commenter two positions above me has got it, I think. As with the Ford Focus Electric and its own exhorbitant price point, Ford has no expectation to sell these in quantity and sets the price high to meet the extremely constrained supply. I know a few diehard Ford fans who will buy Ford and nothing else, and Ford will find a thousand or so of those guys to sell to. It's a compliance car and suffers from the same conversion issues as the Focus (e.g. battery location). Ford is just keeping a toe in the game.

· Spec (not verified) · 2 years ago

Well . . . this may just be first year pricing designed to get as much money out of the people that really want this car. Hopefully the price will drop a bit in the following years.

This price level is a bit disappointing.

· CharlesF (not verified) · 2 years ago

@Chris C., how is any gas plug in hybrid a compliance car?

· Mint (not verified) · 2 years ago

Very disappointed in Ford. After federal tax credit, the CMax Energi is only $1000 more than the similarly equipped CMax Hybrid SEL, or $4000 over the base hybrid, so I had hoped that the Fusion Energi would carry a similar premium.

Instead, the Fusion Energi is, after tax credit, $8545 more than the Fusion SE Hybrid. They're intentionally milking the green crowd at the expense of volume. An additional 6kWh of battery and charger does not warrant a $12k higher MSRP.

· Bubba Nicholson (not verified) · 2 years ago

Sadly, again, this is a non-aerodynamic car. Enclosing the wheel wells will not only increase top speed and acceleration, enclosing the wheel wells properly will diminish the road noises that ruin our sleep in busy cities. Being aerodynamic lowers energy costs. Efficiency needs smooth surfaces shaped just so. Why are artists hired to design these cars? The rear should be a boat tail or some other shape that diminishes drag. Aerodynamic cars are actually bigger cars than this car, too. Bigger, quieter car, more efficient, better value, eh?

· · 2 years ago

Maybe its due to having exactly one Ford in my life and having a pretty horrible experience, but I just can't get excited about ANY Ford Motor Company products. I used to like the Mercury variants, but even the Lincoln-Mercury minus Mercury alphabet soup things leave me cold. Right up there with, remember this?: " The Cadillac that Zings!".

Ford seems less than half-heared regarding EV's. They've made so few Focus EV's, and don't seem to be marketing them nor having demonstrators in show rooms, etc. Plus they seem like a glue-on job of an existing product.

Say what you will about Toyota and Chevrolet, at least they have a few products which I've seen. While I would wish the Rav4 EV was available here, their other products are, and there are a plethera of Volts in area Chevy Showrooms. With a Decent Battery. I get 40-43 miles in the spring and fall, but only 14 in the winter, providing it stays warm enough to prevent the Engine from starting. Using electric heat in the puny ford battery must get you around 7 miles of EV driving. That's really not enough.

At least Sergio is upfront with his hatred of EV's. He states the 500EV is going to be overpriced, and he's going to lose $10000 on every single one sold. Remember a few years ago when Chrysler was going to have a Viper EV, A EV sedan, and a EV Jeep? Fat chance now. As others have said, I bet Ford isn't losing much cash at all.

· · 2 years ago

Maybe its due to having exactly one Ford in my life and having a pretty horrible experience, but I just can't get excited about ANY Ford Motor Company products. I used to like the Mercury variants, but even the Lincoln-Mercury minus Mercury alphabet soup things leave me cold. Right up there with, remember this?: " The Cadillac that Zings!".

Ford seems less than half-heared regarding EV's. They've made so few Focus EV's, and don't seem to be marketing them nor having demonstrators in show rooms, etc. Plus they seem like a glue-on job of an existing product.

Say what you will about Toyota and Chevrolet, at least they have a few products which I've seen. While I would wish the Rav4 EV was available here, their other products are, and there are a plethera of Volts in area Chevy Showrooms. With a Decent Battery. I get 40-43 miles in the spring and fall, but only 14 in the winter, providing it stays warm enough to prevent the Engine from starting. Using electric heat in the puny ford battery must get you around 7 miles of EV driving. That's really not enough.

At least Sergio is upfront with his hatred of EV's. He states the 500EV is going to be overpriced, and he's going to lose $10000 on every single one sold. Remember a few years ago when Chrysler was going to have a Viper EV, A EV sedan, and a EV Jeep? Fat chance now. As others have said, I bet Ford isn't losing much cash at all.

· CharleeS (not verified) · 2 years ago

I have had my 2013 Fusion SE Hybrid for 17 days and have put over 1400 miles on it. Traveling at 70-80 mph, it gets 37 mpg. If speeds are under 63, it gets 44+ mpg. City driving has given me 52 mpg. I considered waiting for the Energi, and I am very glad now I didn't. I'm sure it will have a significant reduction in cargo space compared to the hybrid, and I would never be able to make up for the Energi's extra cost at the rate I pay for electricity. The new Fusion is one of the best looking and handling cars on the road and I'm extremely happy with it.

· CharleeS (not verified) · 2 years ago

I have had my 2013 Fusion SE Hybrid for 17 days and have put 1400 miles on it. At speeds of 70-80 mph, it gets 37mpg. If speeds are kept below 63 mph, MPG is over 44. City driving has given me 52 mpg. I considered waiting for the Energi, and I'm now very happy I didn't. I could not make up for the Energi's extra cost at the rate I pay for any additional electricity, and I'm sure there is a very significant loss of cargo area. The Fusion SE Hybrid is one of the best looking and handling cars on the road. I couldn't be happier with it.

· Jesse Gurr (not verified) · 2 years ago

Someone posted this link on another site. It was his own trials and errors and he seemed to find a technique you can use to get the rated MPG out of the CMAX. I would guess you could do the same for the Fusion hybrid. Very enlightening, and a good read. This guy says its possible from his experience. The technique doesn't seem that hard to do and most people probably do some form of it anyway.

http://fordcmaxhybridforum.com/index.php?/forum/11-ford-c-max-hybrid-pow...

· Anonymous (not verified) · 2 years ago

C-Max Hybrid starts @ 25,200 while C-Max Plugin starts @ 32,950, that's an increase of 7,750.

Fusion Hybrid starts @ 27,200 while Fusion Plugin starts @ 39,500, that's an increase of 12,300.

Why this so much increase. Probably because C-Max plugin has Prius Plugin as competitor, but Fusion Plugin does not have any. Honda will launch Accord Plugin, but that will be priced above Fusion Plugin since Honda feels they are on top of everyone. So until we see plugin version of Camry, Malibu, Sonata at lower prices, this is how expensive plugins will be.

But C-Max Plugin seems to be selling well and will continue to lead boost plugin segment. So we can feel happy about that.

· Spec (not verified) · 2 years ago

I think Mint has it correct. "They're intentionally milking the green crowd . . . . An additional 6kWh of battery and charger does not warrant a $12k higher MSRP."

I suspect the differential in price will drop in the following years. They are just capitalizing on the fact that this is the only big 5 seat PHEV on the market.

· lovedit Anonymous (not verified) · 2 years ago

20Miles per charge is not good. My electric car that I had in 1983, which I loved got twice that.

· G (not verified) · 2 years ago

Sorry Ford. I bought my Honda Insight hybrid in 2000 for $21,000 and it still delivers 60 mpg. If you offer a 150-mile-range EV for 25K, then I'll buy it.

· Modern Marvel Fan (not verified) · 2 years ago

I guess Ford is NOT really interested in selling the Fusion Energi models.

Volt is still the king...

Now, Chevy/GM, get back to work and bring out a 2014 model that sits 5 and have 60 miles EV range and return 45MPG on regular gas in extended mode, people will "flock" to your dealers...

· Anonymous (not verified) · 2 years ago

Ford doesn’t seem to get the point. People are disappointed that you don’t have 5 passengers in the Volt, but they are not from having more EV miles. We need a Volt like with 5 passengers and at least 40 miles EV range not a Volt like with 5 passengers and at most 20 miles EV range.

· Anonymous (not verified) · 2 years ago

Ford doesn’t seem to get the point. People are disappointed that you don’t have 5 passengers in the Volt, but they are not from having more EV miles. We need a Volt like with 5 passengers and at least 40 miles EV range not a Volt like with 5 passengers and at most 20 miles EV range.

· Spec (not verified) · 2 years ago

@Anonymous above me . . .

Oh, I think they get the point. They are just trying to explore the design space more with larger 5-seater that has less miles of electric range. I agree that the Volt presents a better value, but that is not the goal of car companies. They are trying to make a profit. The Volt is not profitable. Perhaps the Ford Fusion Energi is. I'm sure they won't mind selling few cars than the Volt if they make more profit (or lose less money) than the Volt.

As a consumer, sure I want the best value for my money. But as an advocate of EVs, I want to see PROFITABLE EVs on the market because that is the only thing that will ensure the long-term survival of EV offerings.

· Modern Marvel Fan (not verified) · 2 years ago

@ Spec,

There is no info anywhere to show the Fusion Energi or the C-Max Energi is profitable for Ford. Ford doesn't really intend to sell it. It is really a way to "mess" with the competition with introducing large initial cost. Ford really want to sell the regular hybrid version. Also, Ford doesn't want to take a hit in profit since the Federal Government offers them $3,750 per car to help it out...

Volt is actually "profitbable" on per car basis (~$15,000 to $23,000 per car) if you exclude the "initial R&D investment and tooling cost". But since the intial investment is huge (~$1.2Billion), it will take GM about 80,000 Volt or leveraged models just to break even. In order to be profitable, GM would have to sell more than that and continue to do so at a decent annual pace.

GM already sold about 30,000 of Volt and its variant since the launch (Not including November sales). So, it is about 1/3 way there to recover the initial cost. At the current pace, it will break even in 2 more years. (Just in time for the 2014/2015 model redesign).

· · 2 years ago

@Modern Marvel Fan:

Are you joking?

You claim that there is nothing to claim that the C-Max Energi is profitable for Ford, yet just after that you say that the Volt is profitable to the tune of $15k to $23k per car.

You conveniently then wiggle out saying "if you exclude initial R&D investment and tooling cost".

First, you can't just exclude R&D and tooling. They have to be paid for before the Volt is profitable.

You essentially said that I could sell cupcakes for a profit if I don't count my business startup loan or my kitchen equipment...

But really - look at your own math here. The C-Max Energi is only a couple thousand dollars cheaper than the Volt (varies based on trim level of course). So you are expecting us to believe that Chevy can make $15k to $23k on a car that only costs a couple thousand more than the C-Max Energi yet Ford won't be profitable with the C-Max Energi?

The C-Max Energi by every measure is cheaper to build than the Volt, and if you count all the costs including R&D and tooling, the C-Max Energi is DRASTICALLY cheaper to produce.

The C-Max platform already exists at Ford, they are using a platform they already build. The ICE of the Energi is a basic engine which is not all that complex. The Electric motor is pretty basic as well. Both the ICE and electric powertrain are based on the work that Ford had already done with the previous Fusion and Escape. The only really new development for this generation is the transmission is now designed and built by Ford, and the power train software is probably new as well. The batteries are nothing exciting, using off-the-shelf batteries and using fewer of them than the Volt.

By all accounts Ford is using more off the shelf parts, cheaper batteries, and has far less up-front cost sunk into these things.

I don't see how they can't at least be as profitable as the much more complex and radical Volt - if not more. The only extra cost Ford has for the Energi is the larger batteries, and that cost is made up in the higher MSRP.

All that said, I would like for them *both* to be profitable. Competition is a wonderful thing, and we need all the good EV, PHEV, and EREV type cars we can get to get the general public to start to transition away from fossil fuels, and to show the world we can do it.

· Modern Marvel Fan (not verified) · 2 years ago

@Valkraider,

The profit estimate is from those Volt "bashing articles" about how much money Volt loses per car. But those are including the $1.2Billion initial cost spread across all the Volt sold so far. I don't think I need to find you the link for that. You can do a search on "Reuter's article" on Volt.

"You essentially said that I could sell cupcakes for a profit if I don't count my business startup loan or my kitchen equipment..."

Well, there is someting called net profit vs. gross profit. If your cupcakes is making money on per cupcakes basis which is price of the cupcakes minus the floor, sugar, energy to be bake it and labor to make and sell it, then the cup cakes is making money. The cost of business startup loan and kitchen equipment will be spread out across all the cupcakes you sell from that point on. If you sell enough of it initially and to keep up with the payment of those loans and equipment cost, then you are in profit. Nobody spread the initial cost immediately on the first few per unit basis. That is common business sense.

No different from real estate also. If I bought a house for investment @ 200K with monthly mortgage of $800 + $400 of tax and insurance. I rent it for $1500. I am "profitable". But if you spread the cost of $200k on top of the monthly $1,500, then I am at a loss. Nobody does business that way.

Now back to your statement:
"So you are expecting us to believe that Chevy can make $15k to $23k on a car that only costs a couple thousand more than the C-Max Energi yet Ford won't be profitable with the C-Max Energi?"

Well, those $15k to $23k is traced by to the Volt bashing Reuter business article.

Volt cost $7k more than the C-Max Energi. The different is $2k after Federal Tax credit... Big difference.

Now let us look at cost. The only thing that C-max Energi is cheaper than the Volt is in the battery and size of the E-motor. Assuming other parts are similar.
@500/KWh, the difference between Volt and C-Max Energi is about (16-7.5)x$500 = $4,250. But Chevy is $7K more. The motor difference is negliable since Volt uses AC induction motor which is cheaper to make.

Now, we don't know how much Ford has spent on its R&D cost and tooling. Volt uses standard 1.4 L in the GM lineup. Many of the parts are shared with Chevy Cruze (thus frequently used as example to bash Volt). Initial R&D cost are the expensive part due to testing, SW and all the people investment. Ford did the same thing except it didn't make any "big deal" out of it as GM did or get any attacks. Sure, Ford probably didn't have to test it as much. But the current hybrid powertrain is completely new for Ford. It is designed specifically for the C-Max hybrid which will be shared with all the Ford hybrid platform but still an initial cost. Same can be said for Volt where its initial R&D cost will be shared by ELR or other upcoming cars. Many of the SW features already show up in the upcoming Chevy Spark EV. Also, GM's battery isn't from scratch. Its core cell is from LG chemical and assembled by GM in Michigan and packed in a design specified by GM engineers. Much of the EV program at GM is leveraged across other future cars.

Just about the only arguement that you can make is that C-Max is potentially cheaper platform than Cruze since it is projected to be at larger volume. But we don't know. Ford only sold 3,200 so far... I am sure based on the "estimate" Ford will recover its initial cost quicker b/c its technology is already launched into 2 product and part of the hybrid powertrain is shared across 4 different models...

· Anonymous (not verified) · 2 years ago

Anonymous again:

I am a Ford employee and I know we lost several billion just on hybrid and probably won't recover the money until after 2020, I still believe it is the right decision though. As for plug-in and PHEV, there are two goals:
1). California demand zero emission vehicle to be sold by every automaker in the future.
2). IP, this is the reason why Honda, Toyota also produces PHEV and EV, because they want to make sure they own critical IP, the eventual goal is HEV where fuel cell replaces ICE, so every company must possess critical expertise.
3). In the case of our biggested competitor, they have lost more than $5 billion since they sold the 1st ballyhoo at $40K, and probably will lose another 5 billion in the next few years, they are producing extended range vehicle to bring positive corporate image, that is a stupid idea and got laughed at by many experts during battery conferences.

I will soon share with you some videos I recorded during AABC conferences, anyone with a reasonable brain will conclude there is no future in PHEV

As an employee of an auto company, I feel VERY angry why our employers are forced to lose billions just to make some people feel good/green? Al vehicles should be sold at price (fair to the manufacturer), and if there is no sale, the cars should be pulled off the market. Folks from GM feel the same thing, as I have relatives at Warren Tech Center!

· · 2 years ago

@Anonymous,
Regarding your concern about why Detroit must invest money to build vehicles that give us sustainable alternatives:
If you don't, a lot of us will buy Tesla cars that are made in California or, worse, Nissan's made in Tennessee with the profits going to Japan.
We'll then be seen laughing as we zip past $4/gal gas stations in cars that outperform the best Detroit can make. Others will follow us and you'll go the way of Western Union, Baldwin Locomotives, Smith Corona, Polaroid, and Conestoga Wagons.
Sorry dude but you're a buggy whip maker and the era of the carriage is over. Its time to get off your backsides and start moving forward again. I know it is scary to face leaving your comfort zone and get into risky areas. You'll have to work very hard without really knowing where you are going.
Its kind of a shame that your companies chose to start at the low end so it will take you so long to recoup your costs but I really think that with the amount of talent in Michigan, you can do it. So far, I've been very impressed with Ford's hybrids. They are good machines. You guys have what it takes to survive the 21st century if you choose to use it.
I'm not too confident that PHEVs will pay off as quickly as pure EVs, especially overly complex PHEVs such as the Volt but I suspect we'll have to wait for history to reveal the truth.

· Modern Marvel Fan (not verified) · 2 years ago

@Anonymous who claim to be a Ford employee, you said:
"As for plug-in and PHEV, there are two goals:
1). California demand zero emission vehicle to be sold by every automaker in the future."

Apparently, you don't know that PHEV do NOT qualify for CA's Zero Emission requirement...

Either what you said are your own opinon without any facts or you jus don't like what they are doing.

As far as profit/loss goes, if Ford and GM aren't going to make money on those PHEV/EREV/Hybrid soon, then it is ONLY a sign of Detroit's incompetent skills. Maybe that is why Toyota and Nissan and Honda are kicking Detroit's butt. Maybe we should let California startups to give it a try in representating American Engineering capability. But I have faith in GM and Ford. I personally know many engineers working for both of them. (afterall, you can't be an engineer without having friends who work for those two major employer). I believe they are very capable, on par if NOT better than the engineers I know in California. So, it is only a matter of time to see if PHEV/EREV will be here to stay. As far as current sales with those cars go, it is a positive trend so far...

Also, remember global changes will also drive the need for those cars. The rise of India and China will greatly increase the demand for oil and gas. It is only a matter of time before the price of gas go to a point where PHEV becomes a no brainer. And it is also only a matter of time before we have cheaper and more powerful batteries.

· · 2 years ago

@Modern Marvel Fan:
"Volt cost $7k more than the C-Max Energi. The different is $2k after Federal Tax credit... Big difference. "

Point taken. But the actual numbers are:

Base model Volt is MSRP $6195 more than base model C-Max Energi

Fully loaded Volt is MSRP $4810 more than fully loaded C-Max Energi

So if Chevy makes $15 to $23 thousand per Volt sold at MSRP, then even subtracting the difference in price it would be safe to say that Ford should realistically be making money on the C-Max Energi.

There is no way that the C-Max Energi costs Ford $7000 more to produce than the Volt costs Chevy.

Lets assume the least profit is on the entry level models and the most profit comes with the higher equipped models, then there is no way that the fully loaded C-Max Energi costs Ford $19k more to produce than a fully loaded Chevy Volt. No way.

If the Volt can be profitable then so can the C-Max Energi. Period. GM doesn't have magic production powers that make them that drastically different than the rest of the industry.

I don't own stock in either company, and like I mentioned - I want them both to do well. But lets be realistic. The Volt is not magic. If Toyota can make money selling Prius, and Chevy can make money selling Volt - then Ford will most surely make money selling C-Max. I don't know about the Fusion Energi - but the C-Max Energi is not a compliance car, especially since it is already on sale in over 20 markets and will be on sale nation wide by the end of the first quarter. They sold more C-Max Energi's in the one week they were available in October than some compliance cars sell all year...

· · 1 year ago

Official Fusion Energi ratings are 100 MPGe combined (108MPGe in city, 92 MPGe on highway) and the pure electric range is 21 miles as quoted on this site.

· · 1 year ago

The point that is apparently being overlooked is that the cost of having an on-board battery charger is excessive no matter who is producing any of these cars. The Ford product is attractive. I expect to inspect it in the flesh so to speak and will make my judgement then. Gas mileage is not the only consideration in the purchase of a new vehicle. Let's be serious people! Also it is a basic principle of Marketing that you sell to the highest price level possible and then reduce the price to achieve market penetration. Ford is doing what makes sense in recovering their costs of development. Please note that they are returning production of the Fusion to the U.S.

New to EVs? Start here

  1. Electric Cars Pros and Cons
    EVs are a great solution for most people. But not everybody.
  2. Seven Things To Know About Buying a Plug-In Car
    A few simple tips before you visit the dealership.
  3. Incentives for Plug-in Hybrids and Electric Cars
    Take advantage of credits and rebates to reduce EV costs.
  4. Buying Your First Home EV Charger
    You'll want a home charger. Here's how to buy the right one.
  5. The Ultimate Guide to Electric Car Charging Networks
    If you plan to charge in public, you'll want to sign up for charging network membership (or two).
  6. Electric Vehicle Charging for Businesses
    How do you ensure that electric car owners will be happy with every visit to your charging spot?
  7. How to Use the PlugShare EV Charging Station Tool
    Locate EV charging stations and optimize their use with a powerful mobile app.
  8. Quick Charging of Electric Cars
    Add 50 to 60 miles of range in about 20 minutes. Here's how.
  9. The Real Price of EV Public Charging
    Compare the cost of charging on the road to what you pay at home.
  10. Electric Vehicle Charging Etiquette
    Thou shalt charge only when necessary. And other rules to live by.