Curious What $750 Gets You? Pics of the Guts of Nissan LEAF's Charge Station

By · December 02, 2010

Nissan LEAF AeroVironment Charge Station Innards

Well, it was bound to happen eventually. As far as we here at PluginCars.com know, these are the first pics ever seen of what the internal guts of an AeroVironment-branded Nissan LEAF charging station look like.

A user calling himself "Tango" over at the MyNissanLEAF forum posted them yesterday saying, "I wasn't sure if anyone posted pics of the insides yet, so while they were [installing it], I took a couple of pictures of the innards."

Nissan has said that most people who get their LEAF charging stations installed by AeroVironment will pay around $2,200 to $2,500 in hardware, permits and labor—$750 of which is for the actual charge station hardware. While the pictures are interesting in-and-of-themselves for those of us that care about what happens under the hood of all of our equipment, the bigger question the pictures bring up is what, exactly, you're paying for when you plunk down your $750 for the hardware.

Seriously, it looks rather sparse inside, does it not? Perhaps some of you more electrically inclined/engineering types can chime in and let us know if $750 seems reasonable now that we know what's inside?

Nissan LEAF AeroVironment Charge Station Innards

Comments

· · 6 years ago

This doesn't look good for Nissan. GM, on the other hand, has been smart to advertise that the Volt can plug into "any standard outlet".

The more I think about it, the more it seems to me that the current federal tax credit for EVSEs is a waste of money. All the tax credit does is make it easier for Nissan and AeroVironment to justify high prices for something that should be cheap. Instead, the federal government should have increased the tax credit for purchasing an EV.

· Kevin Sharpe (not verified) · 6 years ago

We are a UK charity and donate Level 2 charge points to locations offering public access and free electricity. Our total installed cost for a 240V 32A charge point that will charge two cars simultaneously is less than £500 (~$750). I think these public schemes are a complete waste of tax payers money and we should instead be focusing on an ultra low cost solution that will deliver simple charge points everywhere we go.

· · 6 years ago

@abasile

Nissan is perfectly willing to sell you a Leaf with only L1 "standard outlet" charging, and GM is perfectly willing to sell you their own brand of L2 charger for approximately the same cost as the one pictured. Neither Nissan nor GM manufacture the chargers themselves and the sale of either vehicle is in no way contingent on buying one of these units.

A plain-old 30 Amp NEMA 4 rated disconnect switch without a fuse socket will cost you around $400 from a reputable electric supply house, and those probably don't have to meet half the code requirements this thing does. Wouldn't surprise me if it was NFPA 30A "explosion proof" rated since it gets installed in vehicle garages. $750 might or may not be a little high but they aren't making $700 profit on the thing.

· · 6 years ago

@Smidge204: Yes, but Nissan makes you jump through extra hoops (a "waiver") if you don't want the AV L2 charger. I'm also reacting to the high installation charges quoted by AV's contractors.

· Anonymous (not verified) · 6 years ago

Looks like a ferrite for blocking RF noise, a relay (contactor) for switching power, and a few terminal strips. And some LEDs and switches. Probably the plastic box costs more than the electrical parts.

· Kevin Sharpe (not verified) · 6 years ago

@Smidge204: I have no problem with Nissan and AeroVironment making a profit... however, I'm not sure that the tax payer should be paying for that through a tax credit. We would all be better served by deploying an ultra low cost solution everywhere. If we can install a dual Level 2 charger for less than $750 in total (charger + cable + installation + certification) then I think something is going wrong when you look at the total installation cost of these solutions.

· · 6 years ago

I can't even begin to comment on AV's pricing, and honestly I think that's not quite on-topic since this is about the unit not the whole install. I *personally* feel that the install cost (some as high as $2200 including charger unit, per mynissanleaf forum) is high, but before I make a firm opinion I need to educate myself a bit more.

For reference, though, the EV-Charge America EV2100 for $650 appears to be functionally superior to the Nissan-branded AV unit. That bit of info does raise an eyebrow for me...

· · 6 years ago

Don't forget folks that Level 2 charging can mean any current from 16 Amps (the wimpy charging docks that GM provides for the Volt) to the 30 Amp ones by AeroVironment and Coulomb, to the 80 Amp CS100 by Clipper Creek. Charging time is determined by the lesser of how much current the car can handle and how much the charging dock will provide.
The first generation Leaf and Volt will only handle 16 Amps. For reference, however, all of the '90's EVs that were killed charged at 30 Amps. We've taken a step backward.
If you want to be future proof, you'll probably want to go with at least a 30 Amp (6 kW) charger to allow ~30 mile/hour charging to be sure you can get 100 miles of range during the off-peak rates a night. At 16 miles per hour from a 16 Amp capability, it will take a full 8 hours for a full charge. This means that if your rates drop at midnight and you leave for work at 7:00 am, you won't be fully charged.
You don't have to worry about installing a charge station with too much current. The J-connector only puts out the current that your car asks for but less than it's maximum rating. This means you can plug a 16-amp capable Leaf into a 90-Amp J connector and it will only draw 16 amps. Likewise, if you plug a 70-amp capable Tesla into a 16-amp charge station (through an adapter), it will only draw 16 amps. It is up to you (and your house's wiring) how much you want to prepare to handle. Since the bulk of the installation cost is labor, wiring, and permitting, I recommend installing wiring and probably a charge station to handle at least 30 Amps continuous. It won't cost much more and you'll just have to pay again to upgrade later.
Regarding pricing: Remember that this isn't yet a high volume product and there is a lot of initial cost for certifications and for setting up manufacturing that the manufacturers must recoup. The subsidy is supposed to help offset these costs. Once EV's start being sold in large quantities, I'm sure we'll see charge station prices drop as higher-volume manufacturing techniques can be employed.

· Kevin Sharpe (not verified) · 6 years ago

@ex-EV1 driver: The $750 that I'm quoting is for a charge point that supports 2x32A + 1x13A (240V) or 1x70A (240V). I fully accept that approval costs in the US are higher than in Europe, but our pricing is based on modest volumes of 1,000 units which is what we expect to donate next year. If you look at the total cost of the equipment and installation in the US I think you are getting poor value for money.... we would all be better served by deploying ultra low cost solutions everywhere.

· sjLEAF (not verified) · 6 years ago

What you don't see in the photos is the circuit board that's attached to the back side of the front panel. That contains the logic circuits that talk to the LEAF charger and the status indicator LED's. The J1772 connectors are also quite expensive--I've seen them selling for well over $100 retail. Having developed new products, I can tell you that ex-EV1 driver is right in asserting that development costs are high for the initial units. Installation costs are high as well because, in my case, the installer had to come back for the Code Inspection, which took up a few hours of his time (mostly waiting). Granted that it does sound expensive, but you get a product that you know is safe, will work with the LEAF from Day 1, and comes with rapid response if something goes wrong. Here in the SF Bay area, a "standard installation" will end up costing $300-500 after incentives.

· · 6 years ago

I talked a little bit with someone who's ordered a Leaf and is going through the process: You do not need the L2 EVSE at all. You need the waiver only if you are not using AV for the install., and signing the waiver is a simple checkbox/"I agree" button on the website. With the waiver agreed to, Nissan will apparently let you use any charger installed by anyone, since they are no longer responsible for damage to the vehicle and/or your home.

Waiver here, provided by someone on the mynissanleaf forum.

So based on this and some other information regarding assessment fees and such, I'm more and more suspicious that AV may be exploiting their little monopoly.

@ex-EV1 driver

A good rule of thumb for "maximum miles per hour charged" for L2 charging would be:

Miles of range gained per hour = Breaker Size / 2

This conservatively assumes your vehicle gets 3miles/kWh and that "panel to battery" charging is 90% efficient. In reality the efficiency is probably a little worse and miles/kWh a little better but dividing by 2 is easy and gets you pretty close for at-a-glance estimating.

· Kevin Sharpe (not verified) · 6 years ago

@sjLEAF the components on the logic board cost a few dollars at most. Many people on the Tesla Motors Club forum (www.teslamotorsclub.com) have built J1772 circuits using a cheap pic microcontroller. The bottom line here is that we can install a system for a fraction of the cost and adding yet another financial barrier to the adoption of EV's is shortsighted.

What we need are ultra low cost charge points everywhere. We do not want a limited number of expensive systems paid for by the tax payer.

· Anonymous (not verified) · 6 years ago

I'm not defending AeroEnvironment, but there are a few things to consider along with the points above:

in low volume of less than 100s, the wire for the extension that plugs in to the car is the most expensive part of a unit like this. Non-recurring engineering for the injection molded housing is fairly high and gets spread out over all the units.

Love this site and the sister site, hybridcars.com. Go EV's!

· Kevin Sharpe (not verified) · 6 years ago

@Anonymous. Agreed that volume has a big impact on price... however, I would hope that AeroVironment are making more than a hundred units. Please also remember that the total installed cost is around $2,200 to $2,500 in hardware, permits and labor — that's a significant amount of money.

· · 6 years ago

It is too bad that it is made of plastic, which comes from oil and is not easily recyclable. Aluminum or steel would be better. The actual materials and fabrication can't cost more than $50-100? I'm sure they have a lot of overhead, but it sure would be better if they charged $300-400 for the unit.

Sincerely, Neil

· Anonymous (not verified) · 6 years ago

We just had one of these installed this week. First, it is $760 including shipping, second the minimum installation cost is $800 in addition (absurd), third it is a TOTAL piece of junk. The physical construction is cheap plastic (you should see the little plastic hanger for the cord), there is no usage monitoring, no connectivity with the ethernet or wireless, no way to connect to the utility for time-of-use-charging, no way to set timing to charge off peak (you have to rely on the car for that), no information feedback other than those 5 idiot lights you see. There is just no excuse for this thing. It is an embarrassment. Regret buying it.

· tinhart (not verified) · 6 years ago

I'll share this, for sake of comparisson: I have been approved for a free Level 2 charger from Ecotality - Nissan's other "official" charging station vendor, (I live in the Seattle area) and the total cost of my installation will was quoted as $979.62. From the quote, $544.64 of the total is the cost for the wireman and project manager (so intallation labor), $150 is for permitting, and the remaining $284.98 is the cost of materials (charging station, wiring, circuit breakers, etc).

Note: I have a an optimum install situation though - panel located in garage within a couple feet of install location of Level 2 charger, newer home with higher end electrical, just enough space in my panel to accommodate the 40 Amp (yes, 40 Amp) breaker, after removing an existing 30 Amp breaker, for the charging station. Below is an itemized breakdown of the components the installers will be putting in. So, accounting for my "ideal" situation in the garage where the charger will go, possibly lower permitting and or labor rates in Seattle area than in San Francisco/metropolitan California, I would say this fuels additional speculation about why Aerovironment seems to have an unusually high price for their product:

Description Qty
3/4" CONDUIT - EMT 10
3/4" CONN SS STL - EMT 2
3/4" COUPLING SS STL - EMT 1
3/4" 1-H STRAP - EMT - STEEL 1
# 8 THHN BLACK 30
#8 TO #10x 7/8 PLAS ANCHOR (3/16) 1
#10x 1 P/H SELF-TAP SCREW 1
2P 40A STABIN BREAKER 1
DOCK OUTLET & TESTING 1
1 peanut breaker 1
Demo 30amp circuit 1

· · 6 years ago

We had an even easier installation (mine was the "anonymous" post above about the install this week - sorry forgot to log in). New construction, wires already run from the box to the install location, no new permits required, etc. I mean it was literally a hang-the-box-on-the-wall job. Our construction electrician is putting in the 40 Amp breakers etc. And we are in Houston - definitely not a high-labor-cost area.

· · 6 years ago

@Kevin Sharpe or anyone else who can do better,
Go ahead and do it. Make a better one for cheaper and let us know where we can get them.
I tire of geeks talking like they know everything but are generally clueless as to what it takes to make a real, warranty'd product. Put up or shut up.
@NeilBlanchard,
Puleeze, there can't be more than 3 pounds of plastic in the charger. It takes a lot more than 3 pounds of oil, coal, etc just to work the aluminum or steel for a comparable box. Don't confuse durable petroleum use with expendable use. It also probably takes more than 3 pounds of gasoline just to deliver the charger to your door. Please focus your energy and time on real issues.

Disclosure: I just bought a Clipper Creek charger for our future Leaf, Volt, Model S, FocusEV, etc. They cost a lot more than AeroVironment but are American made, have more power, and a long legacy of reliable operation. Most of their 1990's EV Avcon chargers are still working after over 10 years of total neglect an abuse.

· · 6 years ago

ex-EV1 driver I respectfully disagree (and I have brought to market plenty of warrantied products). This is a consumer appliance and for $1,700 - $2,200 installed you can buy a top of the line 240v dryer installed with an extended warranty or home depot's best drop-in 30" double-oven electric range or couple of 12k btu air conditioners, etc. etc. etc. All of which are far more complex appliances with significantly greater features. Heck, you can buy a high-quality computer with 3 years on site warranty and service for that.

But the real problem I have is not the price (otherwise I would not have bought one). The problem I have is the low quality and the lack of basic features I just assumed would be included on this thing. (I know, I know, buyer beware. Hence this post so now other buyers can be aware.)

I think Nissan and AV just got the whole concept wrong here. They need to think of it like a Direct TV installation only with a much lower-tech gadget and a much simpler installation.

· · 6 years ago

@SolarExec,
Its hard to compare a 240v dryer with an EVSE. Let's break the problem down into 2 parts:
Appliance cost and Installation:
Appliance cost:
There have been tens of millions of 240v dryers and ovens made to date so one can't compare the purchase of one of them with the initial rollout of a new product. Compare this more with the first 5-digit priced big-screen, flat-panel TVs instead to get a more realistic comparison. The EVSE technology clearly isn't as sophisticated but, then neither is the price.
Remember the first cellphones cost over $5,000 each plus about $500 to install in our car. CB radios used to cost $500 each. This is only natural but the costs dropped as sales volume increased.
Installation costs:
As far as installation goes, it is a lot more uncertain for EVSEs than dryers or ranges. NEC625 is specifically prejudice against EVSE, purely because they are for electric vehicles. There is a quagmire of regulations from litigation-scared bureaucrats that differs from city to city, county to county, and state to state, none of which affect the installation of a dryer outlet. It took over a year to get the approvals in place to install the public Tesla charger in the city of Goleta, CA for example with the installers having to jump through a host of hoops. Hopefully, once it has been done once, the process will be a lot easier for the second round. Personally, I cheated, but a corporation such as Nissan can't. I had wiring pulled that would support an EV at the same time as I installed solar on my roof. It cost over $1K for the effort of pulling about 40 feet of cable/conduit. I got past the permitting because I was simply installing a 240v NEMA 14-50 outlet to power my RV - and thus bypassing the discriminatory ruling. I did have to fight the county to be allowed to install the solar but that was a different problem.
As I said, I expect that we'll see prices drop once EVSE installation becomes more of a known quantity.
For the record, it was generally assumed that an installation of a public charger cost around $5000 for the ones installed in the 1990's in California. We're already seeing a significant drop.
I can't speak for the AeroVironment charge station quality since I've only seen mock-ups of them at auto shows, never an actual one.
I also am not sure the extra connectivity features are needed for a home charger, given that the Leaf has its own telematic connectivity. Having web access to a public charger can be useful to tell whether it is working or available but I just don't see as much value for home use if the car is connected.
Note that I've been using an EV charger for over 5 years now without any remote connectivity and I've driven over 60k miles so it clearly isn't a show stopper.
Clearly everyone isn't ready to be a pioneer. I guess it's just a curse some of us inherited from our ancestors who faced a lot more than a couple of thousand dollars to install an EV charger to make their world better.

· · 6 years ago

I'll also add that the first Tesla chargers cost about $4,000. After about a year, the price dropped down to around $1,950, where they are today. $750 seems like a bargain basement model by comparison.

· Kevin Sharpe (not verified) · 6 years ago

@ex-EV1 driver: please re-read my previous comments. We ARE donating 1,000 charge points to public locations that are prepared to give public access and free electricity. The charge points will simultaneously charge three vehicles (two at 240V 32A and one at 240V 13A). The total INSTALLED cost is less than $750 per site.

I personally donated the monies to finance the first 1,000 installations. I have also donated one year of my time to the charity that is running the project. I'm doing this because I passionately believe that we must all take personal responsibility for the transition to EV's and Renewables. If my efforts do not qualify for your definition of "Put up or shut up" then please let me know what does.

If you wish to pay for these expensive systems through your personal taxation then that's fine by me. I don't pay any personal tax in the US only corporate tax for the companies that I own.

· Kevin Sharpe (not verified) · 6 years ago

@ex-EV1 driver: The Tesla charger is a poor comparison. The Tesla HPC is capable of charging at 70A (240V) and has the proprietary and very expensive Tesla power connector. The Nissan (AeroVironment) charger is a J1772 charger that is only capable of 30A (240V). Given J1772 is now the US standard you should be seeing significant downward pressure on price.

· Michael (not verified) · 6 years ago

"The first generation Leaf and Volt will only handle 16 Amps. For reference, however, all of the '90's EVs that were killed charged at 30 Amps. We've taken a step backward."

Maybe not. Faster charging means shorter battery life. Were'nt the EV-1 leases for only three years?

· Kevin Sharpe (not verified) · 6 years ago

@Michael: The Nissan LEAF supports 12A (120V) and 30A (220/240V) using the J1772 plug. It also has an option to add 480V DC 'fast' charge when the car is purchased.

See here for more details;

http://www.nissanusa.com/leaf-electric-car/index#/leaf-electric-car/faq/...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nissan_Leaf#Recharging

The Chevy Volt also supports 120V and 240V charging using the J1772 plug. I'm not sure what the upper current limit is but suspect it will be 30A (240V).

See here for more details;

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chevrolet_Volt

I don't know whether either of these manufacturers recommend charging at low currents to prolong battery life. What I can say is that Tesla support charging rates up to 70A (240V). As far as I'm aware Tesla do not have any restrictions on using 70A and warrant the batteries for 7 years or 100,000 miles;

http://www.teslamotors.com/roadster/specs

· · 6 years ago

We have had battery chargers for two or three decades now and they all have cost under $100.00 and is more complex than this one will ever be and they are made of metal. It makes no sense for this battery charger, which actually has less to it, to cost that much. It seems that the last administration's method of "get everything from the people you can...no matter how," is still running rapid and greed is still in an epidemic state. It is irritating to see these automakers stand up in front of people and lie like a dog in the summer sun and then look at us like we are so stupid that we don't even know that they are lying to us.

· · 6 years ago

I suspect there will be an EVSE on the market, over the next couple of years, which will be a combination Level 1 / Level 2 device. It will have two 120V connectors on it. If you plug it into a single 120v outlet, then it operates as a standard Level 1 EVSE. However, if you plug it into two separate 120v circuits, then it "bonds" the circuits together and it acts like a Level 2 EVSE. This would be useful for EV drivers who 95% of the time only need Level 1 charging but on occasion need a faster charge. Indicators (simple green and red lights) on the EVSE tell you if you are on two separate circuits or just two outlets on the same circuit, which won't work. Because this idea is likely a violation of every NEC and SAE charging standard, the Chinese will make them and sell them on Ebay!

· · 6 years ago

"Because this idea is likely a violation of every NEC and SAE charging standard, the Chinese will make them and sell them on Ebay!"

Nice! Probably not far from the truth :)

· · 6 years ago

@JamesDavis - It's not a charger. The charger is built into the car. This unit (And all other L1/L2 EVSEs) are really just GFCI devices with fancy switches that can be controlled by the car's charging circuits. Of course some models have a lot more features, like data logging/power metering, their own scheduling capabilities, remote control etc. The AV unit is just a relay, some lights and a fault sensor.

@indyflick - There are ways to accomplish that without violating code, but I don't see why it would be necessary at all since there is no reason to use L1 charging if L2 is available. The on-board charger will supposedly not put more than 3.3kW into the battery no matter what, since that's what it's rated at.

· · 6 years ago

@Smidge204 - "but I don't see why it would be necessary at all since there is no reason to use L1 charging if L2 is available". Isn't that a bit like asking, "I don't see why you need a job, if you're a multi-millionaire"? The reason such a polycephaly EVSE may be desirable is because a customer may not want to buy an expensive L2 EVSE and pay an electrician to pull a 240v circuit and install the EVSE. In addition to the costs for a permit and inspection. Also, in the future, the OEMs may not provide a free L1 EVSE with the vehicle.

· · 6 years ago

@indyflick - I have real difficulty imagining a manufacturer not including an L1 charger with the vehicle as standard, which would render the vehicle unusable as-sold and hold the buyer hostage until they pay the ransom of buying an EVSE. That's explicitly illegal in the US. Even if it wasn't, that's not very good for business.

I guess what you're aiming for is L2 power for L1 prices? I find that a little hard to imagine when you'll need 50-ft cords to accomplish what you're describing, plus the costs of the unit's guts to make it work. The $750 units and $1500 install fees are certainly not the kinds of costs you should expect in 5-10 years.

You're also free to install an L2 unit yourself, for the same reasons you're allowed to install something that violates code yourself. The professional install is only required to claim your tax credit and not void your warranty - you're free to disregard both!

· · 6 years ago

On the plastic case: if it was less expensive, and lasted a very long time, I'd be fine with it. But plastic is forever, and aluminum is easily recycleable. Obviously, this is not a critical issue, but for the premium price, one should expect premium build quality.

When you throw something away -- where is away?

Sincerely, Neil

· · 6 years ago

@Kevin Sharpe,
Where are you getting your $750 EVSE including installation from? Is this a volunteer effort with hidden labor costs for manufacturing, installation, and distribution? Are the EVSEs UL approved?
My experience is that if something sounds too good to be true, it usually isn't true.
I agree that mass-market usage will eventually lead to a $750 charger including installation (probably even less) but, to my knowledge, nobody has done this yet.
Please tell me more about the product you're referring to.

· · 6 years ago

@NeilBlanchard,
I don't want to argue this too strongly since I chose a metal EVSE over the plastic ones, however, regarding the ecology of plastic -vs- metal:
Metal will likely last longer but plastic can be much easier to recycle and uses much less energy to manufacture and recycle.
I don't support throwing anything away, especially needlessly.
Reduce, Reuse, Recycle - in that order. Note, however, thar Reducing energy in manufacturing and recycling is very important.

· · 6 years ago

Regarding L1 -vs- L2 charging. My experience is that L1 charging is hardly worth the effort. You only get about 3 to 4 miles per hour of charging. Unless you are going to be parked somewhere for the bulk of a day, it isn't worth the effort.
From a mass-market perspective, L1 charging only really makes sense at airports in long-term parking where you'll be parked for more than a day.

· Kevin Sharpe (not verified) · 6 years ago

@ex-EV1 driver: we are a UK charity and do not need to make a profit. This figure quoted covers the cost of all equipment and labour (at cost). Our suppliers include Gewiss and MK. You could do something very similar in the US if you decided that the cost of $2,200 to $2,500 in hardware, permits and labor was excessive.

For the record, I have a computer hardware and software background, including chip design for Intel. Today, my companies manufacture a range of complex computer based products, many in 10K p/a volumes. I have a very good understanding of the costs of product development and medium volume manufacture.

As a Tesla owner you are clearly wealthy by most of the world's standards. However, you should not assume that the mass market can brush aside the cost of these EVSE's so easily.... for many people in the US $2,200 to $2,500 is a serious amount of money.

· Samie (not verified) · 6 years ago

Ex-ev1driver is right. $700 is what you get for being an early adopter when it comes to being the first to own a mass produced EV or plug-in. When standards emerge and more competition shows up the 700 bucks you pay now will not hold up in the future.

Examples: Remember 5 years ago paying $30-60 dollars for a small HDMI cord at your local brick & mortar store which now you can buy for less than $10.
Or say when you wanted a cell phone charger, wall or car you had to get the official cell phone manufacture/carrier one for $15-20? Now a basic usb cord that costs next to nothing can power up many smart phones.

· Anonymous (not verified) · 6 years ago

The problem is that volumes are low and the product is new, and, in the case of AeroVironment, you have government money. I've read somewhere that after GM sent out its bids for charging stations, but before meeting and getting the quotes, it got the prototypes, took them apart, and figured out how much it would cost to make them. Suffice it to say that the bids were far higher than expected. It's just what happens when you're on the bleeding edge.

With respect to Kevin's installation of public chargers in the UK, wouldn't it be much less costly to install these chargers in the UK than in the US because in the US the standard voltage is 240v rather than 120v? Or do you have to run a separate circuit anyway? (BTW I completely agree with him that many cheap chargers are far better than fewer more expensive ones. Most people will charge at home anyway.)

· Kevin Sharpe (not verified) · 6 years ago

@Samie: The total installed cost is $2,200 to $2,500 as stated in the main article, only "$750 of which is for the actual charge station hardware"

Please also note that a standard already exists and should be driving down costs of the hardware;

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SAE_J1772

My whole point here is that $2,200 to $2,500 is a serious amount of money for most people and I do not accept that it represents good value for money.

· Kevin Sharpe (not verified) · 6 years ago

@Anonymous: most of Europe is 230V (formerly 220V to 240V);

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mains_power_around_the_world

In our installations we always run a unique power feed from the main distribution board. We install cable that supports 100A (230V) to enable future site upgrades. Next to labour the cable is the most expensive part of the whole installation.

Our plan is to drive down the cost of the installation so that we can afford to deploy very large numbers of systems. We think this is a much better solution than a limited number of complex and expensive systems.

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