California Approves $341,045 to Expand Charging Infrastructure

By · November 19, 2012

Charging

The California Energy Commission recently approved funding of $341,045 to increase the state’s charging infrastructure.

The California Energy Commission announced last week that it approved funding of $341,045 to expand the state's plug-in vehicle charging infrastructure. "These investments in charging infrastructure will support the growing number of plug-in electric vehicles on California roadways," stated Energy Commissioner Carla Peterman. "The availability of this charging infrastructure is crucial to fulfilling the Governor's executive order to significantly expand the market for zero emission vehicles in California, which will improve air quality, reduce petroleum use and create jobs."

The Governor's executive order, which was signed into law on March 23, 2012, sets a statewide target of 1.5 million zero emissions vehicles (ZEVs) on California roadways by 2025. Additionally, the order calls for California's charging infrastructure to be sized to support 1 million ZEVs by 2020.

This latest round of approved funding will support the installation of Level 2 (240 volt) charging stations at several additional sites throughout the state. For example, the California Department of Housing and Community Development will receive $200,000 to conduct an assessment of the costs and code requirements for installing electric vehicle charging infrastructure in single-family homes, condos and apartments. The process of permitting, if not streamlined, can create long unnecessary delays in installing charging equipment.

Alternative Energy Systems Consulting, Inc. will also receive $69,446 to install five Level 2 eStation Smart Systems on the campus of the University of California, San Diego. The Office of Fleet and Asset Management will receive $41,475 to install nine Level 2 charging stations at the State Garage in Sacramento, and OurEvolution Energy and Engineering will receive $30,124 to construct, maintain and operate two charging stations in Humboldt County.

Why the focus on Level 2 and not on Quick Charge units? According to research conducted by the California Energy Commission, "Level 2 systems are expected to become the most commonly used charging systems, and are suitable for home, business fleet, and public facilities," whereas quick-charge station are claimed to be "particularly suited for use at highway rest stops."

Comments

· · 1 year ago

Hehe, looks like its going to be the Gravy Train for "Consultants".. That's ok, they need to eat too.

· · 1 year ago

Gravy Train indeed! $69,446 to install 5 L2 EVSEs? Are they wired with solid gold?

"Level 2 systems are expected to become the most commonly used charging systems, and are suitable for home, business fleet, and public facilities," whereas quick-charge station are claimed to be "particularly suited for use at highway rest stops."

I agree most charging will be Level 2. However, it's Level 3 that is really needed to encourage these kinds of numbers (1.5 million by 2025). Especially if by ZEV, they really mean Zero (i.e. they don't count the Volt, PiP, Energi, etc).

· · 1 year ago

@Brian Schwerdt,
Let's see.
$4,000 for the devices at $800 per EVSE
$10,000 for trenching and wiring.
$15,000 to make them network connected at $3,000 extra each so they will have more to spend money on
That leaves:
$40,446 for the consultants to spend doing superfluous data analysis and prepare their next proposal.
I just love government sponsored work :-(

· Anonymous (not verified) · 1 year ago

$341K is basically zero for a budget the size of California's. I'm fine with that, Jerry needs to cut everywhere and get the budget in order. The $7500 Federal tax-credit is more than enough for EVs right now. And that NRG lawsuit settlement will build to some EV chargers. No need for California tax-payer dollars.

· Lad (not verified) · 1 year ago

Does this mean that Blink will finally install their EVSEs on I-5?; that's only two years behind the announcement. Also, I wonder why GM and Ford don't offer their J-1772 level 2
EVSEs for Public use as does Nissan. Oh! may be they don't have any yet...should have thought of that!

· · 1 year ago

@Lad

Do you happen to know precisely what Nissan's policy is? The dealer nearest my home is probably, the BEST! 3 aerovironments on 200 volts in the parking area, and 1 in the shop, all 30 amp chargers... They even enlarged their Electric Service from 300 to 400 amperes to handle the extra 4 Charger Docks!

Other Nissan dealers I see with only 1 public charger that's blocked by employee's vehicles all the time.]

And in Toronto, according to CarStations.com, the 30 amp charger is for Nissan Leaf's only.

And I guess you're right about the Chevy Dealerships. The ones by me have one 15 amp Voltec, and one 30 amp chargepoint, both on 208, and neither for the public.

· · 1 year ago

@Lad

Do you happen to know precisely what Nissan's policy is? The dealer nearest my home is probably, the BEST! 3 aerovironments on 200 volts in the parking area, and 1 in the shop, all 30 amp chargers... They even enlarged their Electric Service from 300 to 400 amperes to handle the extra 4 Charger Docks!

Other Nissan dealers I see with only 1 public charger that's blocked by employee's vehicles all the time.]

And in Toronto, according to CarStations.com, the 30 amp charger is for Nissan Leaf's only.

And I guess you're right about the Chevy Dealerships. The ones by me have one 15 amp Voltec, and one 30 amp chargepoint, both on 208, and neither for the public.

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