2013 Ford Fusion Energi Rated at 100 MPGe

By · December 31, 2012

Ford Fusion Energi

“The Fusion Energi plug-in hybrid is the exclamation point for Ford’s transformed lineup of fuel-efficiency leaders that now beats Toyota across the board.”

Raj Nair
Ford's group vice president of global product development

Ford is quick to point out that the Fusion Energi's official MPGe ratings beat the Toyota Prius Plug-In Hybrid by a slight margin. The official numbers for the 2013 Fusion Energi are 108 MPGe city; 92 MPGe highway; and 100 MPGe combined. The Prius Plug-In Hybrid is rated at 95 MPGe combined.

Though Ford claims that the Fusion Energi is the country's most fuel-efficient sedan, the distinction in terms of a few MPGe is essentially immeasurable in real-world use. What's more likely to be beneficial to owners of the Fusion Energi is its predicted electric-only range of 20 miles.

The Fusion Energi is priced at $39,495 (excluding up to $3,750 in federal tax credits). Its competitors in the plug-in hybrid segment are the Toyota Prius Plug-In Hybrid, the 2014 Honda Accord PHEV, and for some shoppers, the Chevy Volt.

The Fusion Energi is expected to hit US dealerships in January. It's likely to be one of the most popular new plug-in cars to be introduced in 2013.

Comments

· · 1 year ago

"Though Ford claims that the Fusion Energi is the country's most fuel-efficient sedan, the distinction in terms of a few MPGe is essentially immeasurable in real-world use. What's more likely to be beneficial to owners of the Fusion Energi is its predicted electric-only range of 20 miles."

IMHO, the above paragraph should read:

Though Ford claims that the Fusion Energi is the country's most fuel-efficient sedan, the distinction in terms of a few MPGe is essentially immeasurable in real-world use. What's more likely to be important to owners of the Fusion Energi is its fuel economy after the electric-only range of 20 miles is exhausted.

That's just my take. Anybody know what the final MPG numbers are in hybrid mode?

· Jesse Gurr (not verified) · 1 year ago

Mike,
Probably similar to the C-Max Energi's number of 44/41/43 in gas mode.

· Modern Marvel Fan (not verified) · 1 year ago

Does most buyer understand the difference between 110 and 100 MPGe? Sure, it is 10%. But how much does it really mean in $$$$?

Those MPGe rating are "useless" since EPA's test cycle is ULTRA stupid. Extend the test cycle to 30 miles and see how much lower is that MPGe rating...

· · 1 year ago

@MMF,

The MPGe is the same regardless of the battery size. It only measures the efficiency while the vehicle is operating on electricity. It is not "useless", it is simply confusing. The less confusing figure is miles per kWh. However, people don't have a feel for that number the way they do for MPG. The 100 MPGe combined for the Fusion Energi equates to about 2.94 mi/kWh. The EPA states this as 34 kWh/100mi.

See below:
http://fueleconomy.gov/feg/label/learn-more-PHEV-label.shtml

Also, Jesse, it's obvious that it should be similar to the C-Max Energi. It's the same powertrain. I was asking if there were any official numbers yet. The Fusion Energi may actually have a higher highway MPG on gasoline than the C-Max Energi due to body shape.

· · 1 year ago

A full back seat, that is certainly a good point that make it somewhat useful. It has also a nice look.

Unfortunately the rest is just disappointing. From old fashion nail based tachymeter, to “m’a tu vu” leather seats, exotic wood decoration and other useless items. The car really misses on the essential, a 75 miles EV range, instead of just 20 miles which is at best, a me too, on the Plug-in Prius and at worst half that of the already short ranged Volt. The fusion energy engine is also not a Flex-Fuel engine which is strange for a supposedly green car. Being able to drive on electricity must be combined with being able to drive on ethanol to get the full meaning of oil free driving.

· CharlesF (not verified) · 1 year ago

@Priusmaniac, can you name a flex-fuel hybrid that you can find on a dealers lot? For that matter can you go and test drive any plug in hybrid with a 75 mile all EV range?

I did not think so. So the Ford is disappointing because it does not do what no car has come close to doing? That is a very high standard you have for new cars. I am shocked you can find any car that is not disappointing.

The 20 mile all EV range beats the EPA estimated all EV range of the Prius Plug In (PIP) by a larger percentage than the Volt beats the Fusion (6, 20, 38, +233% vs +90%). Even if you use a 10 mile all EV range for the PIP, the above statement still holds true.

· Modern Marvel Fan (not verified) · 1 year ago

Has anyone seen the "truck" of that Energi model? It is almost "useless". Wonder why no photo ever show it? Accord Plugin is already terrible with its limited truck space. Not to mention that you just lost all the ability with fold down seat and truck pass through..

· Modern Marvel Fan (not verified) · 1 year ago

"The MPGe is the same regardless of the battery size. It only measures the efficiency while the vehicle is operating on electricity"

It is ONLY that way b/c EPA is retarded in listing its efficiency rating. There is NO way Energi model can pull that efficiency rating if the EPA testing is beyond 30 miles. EPA using its 11 miles test cycle to get the efficiency, then extend that out to either energy usage per 100 miles or its MPGe.

Sure, it is an efficiency rating, which should be independent of size of battery or range of the vehicle. But we all know that is NOT the case in real world since EPA testing results are STRONGLY correlates with distance in its test cycle.

But I do agree that miles/KWh is a more useful rating, especially for its EV mode.

· · 1 year ago

@•CharlesF
Indeed there is unfortunately no Flex-Fuel hybrid and no plug in hybrid with a 75 mile all EV range. And that is exactly the problem. When we see that Tesla is able to place a battery under the floor that can make more than 200 miles and that Flex-Fuel cars are almost old technology, it is a real question mark why the car manufacturers stubbornly refuse to put a 75 EV miles Flex-fuel car on the market. They wouldn’t do better in a world where they would try to please the oilies as much as possible. Instead of adding luxuries and unnecessary gadgets like Self Park or i-things they would do a better job at just producing the above mentioned car. In any case it really isn’t glorious to see all this time being wasted when the solution is so obvious to drive oil free.

· Modern Marvel Fan (not verified) · 1 year ago

"Indeed there is unfortunately no Flex-Fuel hybrid and no plug in hybrid with a 75 mile all EV range."

Cost and Weight.

Tesla S is a $100k vehicle or at least $70k...

· · 1 year ago

@Modern Marvel Fan

Micro range extender, micro cost. Relatively small 75 miles battery, low weight. So what else?

· Modern Marvel Fan (not verified) · 1 year ago

"Micro range extender, micro cost. Relatively small 75 miles battery, low weight. So what else?"

What did you get the idea that "micro range extender means micro cost"?

Automakers can make ICE at a cost of ~$2-$3 per HP. So the size of the engine really doesn't make that much difference in cost. But once you have an engine and all the associated control, cooling and maintainence system start to add cost and weight.

@ 4miles/KWh, a 75miles battery with NO margins would be 20 KWh. Typically, with margins and derating, it would require a 24KWh battery. That is size of NIssan Leaf's battery pack or Ford Focus. Then if you add a small engine, transmission and cooling system to it, it would have push E-Ford Focus/Leaf into $50k price range.

Nobody is going to buy a $50k EREV Focus. At $40k, Volt is already facing resistance. Until people can cut the battery weight and cost in half, any 70miles EREV is basically a dream.

Although I would be the first one to buy one if they make one as long as the price is under $35k.

· Modern Marvel Fan (not verified) · 1 year ago

@Priusmaniac,

Let us look at it another way. PIP Is about $5k premium over a regular Prius. That is how much the extra battery and larger motor cost. So, you would need something that is 6x larger in battery size. Assuming the incremental cost is only 1/3. That would still cost at least another $10k on top of the PIP to get you the 70 miles electric range. NOT to mention that it will add additional 750lbs to the weight. That would require some major modification to the car. It would push the 70 miles PIP into a $50k range with 4,000 lb weight.

Now, look at it another way. Take an electric Ford Focus or Leaf and add a generator and engine to it. How much do you think a 50HP generator and engine cost? It would be at least $8k just for those two components, NOT counter the transmission and cooling system (air cooled). So, you are talking about at least $10k on top of those BEVs to have a "micro" extender. 50HP is going to be pretty small (or "micro") for those 4,000lbs (2ton)+ vehicles.

Now, how many people are willing to pay $50k for a car that is even slower than today's PIP or Leaf that weighs over 4,000 lbs and have worse MPG in extended mode than a Volt?

Most people who shop at $50k are going to compare it to a $50k ICE car. That is why Volt only has about half of the range of Leaf but it has an range extender and make a sacrifice by losing 1 seat.

· · 1 year ago

@Modern Marvel Fan

Can’t be done? Well, I am not convinced. When you look at the small generators you can find them complete off the shelf like here:

http://www.sdmo.com/EN/Products/PPW/Portable-power-generators/3499231000014

If you consider the buying power of Ford motor company they can sure make them at even less than a 2000$ price. OK they would have to integrate it in the car but that can be done when you start a vehicle from scratch. BTW: transmission is not needed just wires.

· Modern Marvel Fan (not verified) · 1 year ago

@Priusmaniac,

So, according to your link, that "outdated" engine powered generator (FAR LESS efficient than your onboard generator) cost about $2,000 and generates ONLY 20HP!!!!!!!

Please tell me how that 20HP is going to power your 4,000lb+ (2Ton+) weight in "extended range mode"....

I sure hope you don't drive downhill most of the time. That is SMALLER generator than your "tiny" Prius's onboard generator...

If transmission is NOT needed, then you are forcing it into a series ONLY configuration which will require FAR HIGHER peak output than just 20 HP.

Please, let us get real here. The only way to get it down is to either find new breakthrough technology that will lower the battery weight and cost down by 1/2.

Tesla S is a perfect example why it is so costly to do so...

But I hope that I am proven wrong in the next 5-7 years....

· math geek (not verified) · 1 year ago

A 20 HP generator can propel a Nissan Leaf at 60 mph, Assuming the Leaf averages 4 miles/kWhr in efficiency.

· Modern Marvel Fan (not verified) · 1 year ago

"20 HP generator can propel a Nissan Leaf at 60 mph, Assuming the Leaf averages 4 miles/kWhr in efficiency."

Really? Sure, 20HP is 15KW. 60mph would mean 15KW @ 4 m/KWhr.

However, you forgot the "real world" demand of the car.

Do you need power for A/C/heat? Acceleration? Hills? If that is the "max", then it wouldn't work.

FYI, Leaf doesn't average 4mi/KWhr, certainly NOT at 60mph.

· · 1 year ago

@Modern Marvel Fan

As Math Geek said there is no need of high power but only average. Don’t forget that the battery, even almost empty can still make its short time (about 1 minute that is) buffering effect. Since acceleration from 0 to 60 mph takes only a few seconds that is more than enough to compensate the temporary higher power required at that precise moment. On the other end, when you slow down from 60 to 0 mph, your regen is still sending that energy back in your battery even if the range extender is already charging it. If you happen to stop at a traffic light, you not only don’t consume but your range extender keeps on producing its full 15 KW. In those conditions indeed 15 KW is more than enough (I think it is even enough with less power as a range extender) to keep driving at 60 or even 75 mph. By the way, there is nothing that prevents different range extender powers to be proposed by Ford, exactly in the same way as Tesla is proposing different battery energy contents on the Model S. You could have 15 KW, 20 KW, or 50 KW. In fact for a stranded EV the most important thing is essentially having one, because now they have none and are really stuck. The Leaf is such a case and the GM Volt and Ford Fusion energi have at contrary a total double motorization which is the other extreme. In that sense a micro range extender of 15 KW is the winning middle solution formula, there is one present but not a to big one neither.

· · 1 year ago

You must live in flatland. Here in California we have mountains and that complicates things. To drive up a mountain at speed takes a lot of power so a tiny range extender just wont work.

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